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supreme court justice

Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies aged 87

The supreme court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died of pancreatic cancer, the court said Friday. She was 87. Ginsburg was the second woman appointed to the court in history and became a liberal icon for her sharp questioning of witnesses and intellectually rigorous defenses of civil liberties, reproductive rights, first amendment rights and equal protections under the law.

Damaging Hillary Clinton

Trump 'associates' offered Assange pardon

Two political figures claiming to represent Donald Trump offered Julian Assange a “win-win” deal to avoid extradition to the US and indictment, a London court has heard. Under the proposed deal, outlined by Assange’s barrister Jennifer Robinson, the WikiLeaks founder would be offered a pardon if he disclosed who leaked Democratic party emails to his site, in order to help clear up allegations they had been supplied by Russian hackers to help Trump’s election in 2016.

The Guardian

Donald Trump accused of sexual assault

A former model has come forward to accuse Donald Trump of sexually assaulting her at the US Open tennis tournament more than two decades ago, in an alleged incident that left her feeling “sick” and “violated”. In an exclusive interview with the Guardian, Amy Dorris alleged that Trump accosted her outside the bathroom in his VIP box at the tournament in New York on 5 September 1997.

COVID-19: The Bombshell

“That’s Their Problem”

First-person accounts of a tense meeting at the White House in late March suggest that President Trump’s son-in-law resisted taking federal action to alleviate shortages and help Democratic-led New York. Instead, he enlisted a former roommate to lead a Consultant State to take on the Deep State, with results ranging from the Eastman Kodak fiasco to a mysterious deal to send ventilators to Russia.

COVID-19

Wealth of US billionaires rises by nearly a third

The already vast fortunes of America’s 643 billionaires have soared by an average of 29% since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, which has at the same time laid waste to tens of millions of jobs around the world. The richest of the superrich have benefited by $845bn , according to a report by a US progressive thinktank, the Institute for Policy Studies. The report calculated that 643 billionaires had racked up $845bn in collective wealth gains since 18 March.

Corruption

Trump's nasty business with the Secret Service

President Trump’s luxury properties have charged the U.S. government more than $1.1 million in private transactions since Trump took office — including for room rentals at his Bedminster, N.J., club this spring while it was closed for the coronavirus pandemic, new documents show. The documents, including receipts and invoices from Trump’s businesses, were released by the Secret Service after The Washington Post filed a public-records lawsuit.

ABC Townhall

Donald Trump squirms in TV spotlight

In a rare excursion outside the friendly media bubble of Fox News on Tuesday night, Donald Trump took questions directly from uncommitted American voters at a televised “town hall” type event, in an experiment his campaign might not be in a hurry to repeat.

highest-profile celebrity relationship

Cardi B files for divorce from rapper Offset

Cardi B has filed for divorce from rapper husband Offset. The filing was made in Georgia, with an initial hearing set for 4 November.

US young adults on the Holocaust

Nearly two-thirds unaware 6m Jews killed

Almost two-thirds of young American adults do not know that 6 million Jews were killed during the Holocaust, and more than one in 10 believe Jews caused the Holocaust, a new survey has found, revealing shocking levels of ignorance about the greatest crime of the 20th century.

Pew Research Center

Donald Trump is the least trusted major world leader

The image of the US and Donald Trump around the world has plunged from poor to the abysmal over the administration’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic, according to a global survey.

Apple

Tech giant unveils new watch series 6

Apple showed off its latest smartwatch with faster computing power and an ability to measure blood oxygen as well as updated iPads on Tuesday as interest rises in such devices among homebound users looking for help tracking exercise and logging hours of remote work and learning.

News

Corruption

Trump's nasty business with the Secret Service

President Trump’s luxury properties have charged the U.S. government more than $1.1 million in private transactions since Trump took office — including for room rentals at his Bedminster, N.J., club this spring while it was closed for the coronavirus pandemic, new documents show. The documents, including receipts and invoices from Trump’s businesses, were released by the Secret Service after The Washington Post filed a public-records lawsuit.


Breonna Taylor

Louisville officials agree to pay family $12m

The city of Louisville, Kentucky, has reached a $12m settlement with the family of Breonna Taylor in a civil suit stemming from the fatal shooting by police of the 26-year-old inside her apartment in March, according to reports.

Alexei Navalny

Poisoned Putin critic plans return to Russia

Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny on Tuesday posted a picture of himself from his hospital bed in Germany where he’s recuperating from being poisoned with a nerve agent, wryly joking about being able to breathe on his own.


Roger Stone

Martial law if Trump loses election

Roger Stone, whose 40-month prison sentence for lying to Congress and witness tampering in the Russia investigation was commuted by Donald Trump, has said Trump should seize total power and jail prominent figures including Bill and Hillary Clinton and Mark Zuckerberg if he loses to Joe Biden in November.

Microsoft

Russian hackers targeting US political campaigns

The same Russian military intelligence outfit that hacked the Democrats in 2016 has attempted similar intrusions into the computer systems of organizations involved in the 2020 elections, Microsoft said Thursday.

Donald Trump · Rage

Bob Woodward rejects massive criticism

Bob Wooodward has been forced to defend himself against criticism that he waited too long to reveal that Donald Trump had told him in early February that he knew coronavirus was “deadly stuff”.

Bob Woodward · Rage

Trump admits he lied about COVID-19 threat

President Donald Trump knew in early February that the coronavirus posed a unique and deadly threat to the United States, and was “more deadly than even your strenuous flus.”

Shortnews

COVID-19

Connecticut to fine people who don't wear masks

Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont (D) said Monday that the state will impose fines on people who do not adhere to the state’s mask mandate and limits on event capacity. Under a new executive order issued from Lamont, residents will be required to pay $100 fines for not wearing masks, up to $250 for going to large unauthorized events and up to $500 for planning unauthorized events, according to the Hartford Courant. Under present rules, events are limited to 25 people indoors and 100 people outdoors.

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COVID-19

Connecticut to fine people who don't wear masks

Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont (D) said Monday that the state will impose fines on people who do not adhere to the state’s mask mandate and limits on event capacity. Under a new executive order issued from Lamont, residents will be required to pay $100 fines for not wearing masks, up to $250 for going to large unauthorized events and up to $500 for planning unauthorized events, according to the Hartford Courant. Under present rules, events are limited to 25 people indoors and 100 people outdoors.

Connecticut Chief Operating Officer Josh Geballe said the order is set to take effect Thursday at midnight. He told the newspaper the state has struggled with how to enforce the mandates.

Local officials currently can issue a $1,000 fine for a violation of the state travel advisory or a misdemeanor charge, which many local officials consider excessive.

“There wasn’t really much that was being done, because many people viewed [a misdemeanor charge] as excessively harsh for failing to wear a mask if you couldn’t socially distance,” Geballe told the Courant. “So they asked for this new tool, an infraction that was a bit of a step-down enforcement.”

Fines already exist for some individual municipalities in the state such as the town of Simsbury, where a violation of either masking or social distancing orders is punishable by a $250 fine.

“It’s come up over and over again, to the point where we felt it was an appropriate thing to do,” Geballe told the Courant.

The order comes as the state’s positivity rate for coronavirus tests has been on the rise. The rate hovered below 1 percent between mid-July and early September, but reached 1.5 percent last Wednesday and has not returned below 1 percent since.

As of Tuesday the state has 54,895 confirmed cases and 4,485 confirmed deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Fox News

Trump accuses Biden of taking drugs

Fox News broadcast an interview in which Donald Trump without any evidence accused Joe Biden of taking drugs to get him through debates. “I think there’s probably – possibly – drugs involved,” Trump told Jeanine Pirro. “That’s what I hear. I mean, there’s possibly drugs. I don’t know how you can go from being so bad where you can’t even get out a sentence … ”. Trump did not finish his own sentence, but he went on to say he was referring to the Democratic presidential nominee’s hesitant performances in early primary debates, before his surge to victory on the back of a win in South Carolina.

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Fox News

Trump accuses Biden of taking drugs

Fox News broadcast an interview on Saturday night in which Donald Trump without any evidence accused Joe Biden of taking drugs to get him through debates. “I think there’s probably – possibly – drugs involved,” Trump told Jeanine Pirro. “That’s what I hear. I mean, there’s possibly drugs. I don’t know how you can go from being so bad where you can’t even get out a sentence … ”. Trump did not finish his own sentence, but he went on to say he was referring to the Democratic presidential nominee’s hesitant performances in early primary debates, before his surge to victory on the back of a win in South Carolina.

“You saw some of those debates with the large number of people on the stage,” Trump said. “He was, I mean, I used to say, ‘How is it possible that he can go forward?”

According to the president, Biden won the nomination because the progressive vote was split.

“And he only won because Elizabeth Warren didn’t drop out,” he said. “Had she dropped out Bernie [Sanders] would’ve won Super Tuesday, every state, and you would’ve had Bernie instead of Biden.”

Trump’s claim came not long after his oldest son, Donald Trump Jr, denied claims he used cocaine before speaking at the Republican convention. Remarkably enough, it was also not the first time Trump, 74, has accused Biden, 77, of taking drugs.

Speaking to the Washington Examiner last month, the president said: “We’re going to call for a drug test, by the way, because his best performance was against Bernie [in the final debate] … It wasn’t that he was Winston Churchill because he wasn’t, but it was a normal, boring debate. You know, nothing amazing happened. And we are going to call for a drug test because there’s no way – you can’t do that.”

In the Fox interview broadcast told Fox News he would happily “put down very quickly” any leftwing protests. “Look, it’s called insurrection. We just send in and we, we do it very easy. I mean, it’s very easy. I’d rather not do that, because there’s no reason for it, but if we had to, we’d do that and put it down within minutes, within minutes.”

Trump has sent federal agents to confront protesters, most prominently in Portland. In the Fox interview Trump said it was “retribution” when US Marshals shot dead a suspect in the Portland killing of a member of a rightwing group.

Trump and Biden are due to debate in Cleveland on 29 September, in Miami on 15 October and in Nashville on 22 October. The vice-presidential nominees Mike Pence and Kamala Harris will meet in Salt Lake City on 7 October.

Trump is famously teetotal and disapproving of drug use but his political rise has been fueled by a well-documented love for Diet Coke and junk food. Beset by speculation about his physical and cognitive health, earlier this month the president was moved to deny rumours that a “series of ministrokes” prompted a short-notice visit to hospital in Washington last November.

COVID-19: Latest News

“Rounding the final turn”

Trump claimed the US is “rounding the final turn” in its coronavirus crisis as the country’s death toll nears 200,000. The president said during a White House press conference today, “We’re rounding the final turn, and a lot of good things are happening.” In reality, at least 191,536 Americans have already died from the virus, representing a far higher death toll than any other country in the world.

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COVID-19: Latest News

“Rounding the final turn”

Trump claimed the US is “rounding the final turn” in its coronavirus crisis as the country’s death toll nears 200,000. The president said during a White House press conference today, “We’re rounding the final turn, and a lot of good things are happening.” In reality, at least 191,536 Americans have already died from the virus, representing a far higher death toll than any other country in the world.

Trump insisted he did not lie to the American people about coronavirus, after journalist Bob Woodard revealed that the president admitted to downplaying the pandemic back in March. During his press conference today, Trump again said he was only trying to keep the public calm, but Woodward reports in his new book that the president acknowledged coronavirus was deadly and airborne back in February, as he publicly dismissed concerns about the virus.

Another 884,000 Americans filed first-time claims for unemployment last week. The latest numbers from the labor department, which are nearly identical to the figures from a week before, indicate the US job market is losing steam six months after the start of the pandemic.

The Republican “skinny” coronavirus relief bill failed to pass the Senate. As expected, Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell failed to secure the 60 votes necessary to advance the legislation, leaving no current path forward for a relief package.

Microsoft warned that hackers from Russia, China and Iran have launched unsuccessful attacks on people associated with both major presidential campaigns. “The activity we are announcing today makes clear that foreign activity groups have stepped up their efforts targeting the 2020 election as had been anticipated,” Microsoft said in a statement.

House speaker Nancy Pelosi said Trump’s efforts to downplay the pandemic show his “contempt” for Americans’ health. The Democratic speaker said the president’s comments to Woodward about trying to downplay the seriousness of coronavirus “showed his contempt -- contempt for the American people and their health, contempt for science, contempt for any real effort to crush the virus, contempt for his supporters, their children, their parents.”

Census

Federal judges block Trump admin

A panel of three federal judges blocked the Trump administration on Thursday from excluding undocumented immigrants from the census totals used to determine how many seats in Congress each state gets. Trump acted unlawfully in July when he ordered the Commerce Department to produce data that would allow him to exclude undocumented immigrants from the count, the panel said. Federal law is clear that only a single data source – the census count of total population – can be used to apportion the 435 seats in the US House among states, the judges wrote.

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Census

Federal judges block Trump admin

A panel of three federal judges blocked the Trump administration on Thursday from excluding undocumented immigrants from the census totals used to determine how many seats in Congress each state gets. Trump acted unlawfully in July when he ordered the Commerce Department to produce data that would allow him to exclude undocumented immigrants from the count, the panel said. Federal law is clear that only a single data source – the census count of total population – can be used to apportion the 435 seats in the US House among states, the judges wrote.

The decennial census does not ask about citizenship status and by requesting a second set of data outside of the decennial census, Trump ran afoul of the law.

“Congress mandated that the president use a specific set of numbers – those produced by the decennial census itself – for purposes of the reapportionment,” the panel wrote. “By deviating from that mandate, the presidential memorandum exceeds the authority of the president.” The three judges who issued the unanimous ruling were US district judge Jesse Furman, an appointee of Barack Obama and appellate judges Peter Hall and Richard Wesley, George W Bush appointees.

The decision, which is likely to be appealed to the US supreme court, is a major legal win for the civil rights and immigration groups, as well as nearly two dozen states and several cities, that challenged the law. The federal government has long included immigrants, regardless of their legal status, in the apportionment count and excluding them was understood as an unmistakable effort to preserve political power for white Americans.

“This is a huge victory for voting rights and for immigrants’ rights. President Trump has tried and failed yet again to weaponize the census against immigrant communities,” said Dale Ho, the director of the Voting Rights Project at the American Civil Liberties Union, which helped represent some of the plaintiffs. “The law is clear – every person counts in the census.”

The ruling is the latest development in an ongoing legal battle over the 2020 census. The US supreme court blocked an effort to add a citizenship question to the decennial survey last year and there are ongoing legal challenges seeking to force the Trump administration to extend the deadline for counting Americans.

COVID-19

Republicans fail to advance stimulus bill

The Senate failed Thursday to advance a Republican coronavirus stimulus plan, the latest blow to stalled efforts to pass another package to mitigate the pandemic’s economic damage. The measure fell short of the 60 votes needed on a procedural step to move toward passage. All Democrats present, and one Republican — Rand Paul of Kentucky — opposed it in a 52-47 vote. The nearly unanimous vote for the GOP followed weeks of disagreements within the Republican caucus about whether to pass any more aid at all.

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COVID-19

Republicans fail to advance stimulus bill

The Senate failed Thursday to advance a Republican coronavirus stimulus plan, the latest blow to stalled efforts to pass another package to mitigate the pandemic’s economic damage. The measure fell short of the 60 votes needed on a procedural step to move toward passage. All Democrats present, and one Republican — Rand Paul of Kentucky — opposed it in a 52-47 vote. The nearly unanimous vote for the GOP followed weeks of disagreements within the Republican caucus about whether to pass any more aid at all.

The legislation would have reinstated enhanced federal unemployment insurance at a rate of $300 per week, half of the $600 weekly payment that expired at the end of July. It also would have authorized new small business loans and put money toward schools and into Covid-19 testing, treatment and vaccines.

The measure did not include a second $1,200 direct payment to individuals. It also lacked new relief for cash-strapped state and local governments or money for rental and mortgage assistance and food aid — all priorities for Democrats.

“It is beyond insufficient. It is completely inadequate,” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said of the GOP plan earlier Thursday.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, brought the measure to the Senate floor this week as efforts by the Trump administration and Democratic leaders to strike a bipartisan relief agreement remained stalled.

He aimed not only to show that Republicans, and particularly vulnerable GOP senators running for reelection this year, were taking action to fight the pandemic, but also to put pressure on Democrats ahead of Election Day.

“They can tell American families they care more about politics than helping them,” McConnell said of Democratic senators who oppose the bill.

Congress has failed to pass a fifth coronavirus aid package even as the outbreak infects tens of thousands of Americans per day and economic pain felt by millions of jobless people sharpens. Lifelines including the jobless benefits, a federal moratorium on evictions and the window to apply for Paycheck Protection Program small business loans have all lapsed.

While President Donald Trump has taken unilateral steps to extend temporary unemployment aid to some Americans and limit evictions for a few months, only Congress can pass comprehensive relief because it controls federal spending.

Doubts have grown about lawmakers’ ability to approve any more stimulus during the heated final weeks before the 2020 election. Even so, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told reporters Thursday she is hopeful Congress can pass another bill before the Nov. 3 election.

Asked Wednesday about whether another relief bill would come together, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin responded, “I don’t know.”

“We’ll see. I hope there is. It’s important to a lot of people out there,” the top Trump administration negotiator in aid talks said.

As Republicans try to hold on to their 53-47 Senate majority in November, every GOP incumbent running this year supported the aid package. The most vulnerable Senate Democrat, Doug Jones of Alabama, opposed it.

So did Sens. Gary Peters of Michigan, Jeanne Shaheen of New Hampshire and Tina Smith of Minnesota, all of whom will face voters this year in states where the 2016 election was close.

Politics

supreme court justice

Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies aged 87

The supreme court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg has died of pancreatic cancer, the court said Friday. She was 87. Ginsburg was the second woman appointed to the court in history and became a liberal icon for her sharp questioning of witnesses and intellectually rigorous defenses of civil liberties, reproductive rights, first amendment rights and equal protections under the law.


COVID-19: The Bombshell

“That’s Their Problem”

First-person accounts of a tense meeting at the White House in late March suggest that President Trump’s son-in-law resisted taking federal action to alleviate shortages and help Democratic-led New York. Instead, he enlisted a former roommate to lead a Consultant State to take on the Deep State, with results ranging from the Eastman Kodak fiasco to a mysterious deal to send ventilators to Russia.

ABC Townhall

Donald Trump squirms in TV spotlight

In a rare excursion outside the friendly media bubble of Fox News on Tuesday night, Donald Trump took questions directly from uncommitted American voters at a televised “town hall” type event, in an experiment his campaign might not be in a hurry to repeat.


raging wildfires on the West Coast

Trump says 'science doesn't know' what's causing wildfires

President Donald Trump and his Democratic rival, Joe Biden, on Monday offered a striking split screen on the role of climate change in raging wildfires on the West Coast, with each staking out dramatically different positions on what has caused the blazes that have consumed vast amounts of acreage in California in recent weeks.

conspiracy theory

QAnon spreads across globe, shadowing COVID-19

The QAnon movement is spreading around the world, turning an outlandish conspiracy theory revolving around President Trump into one of the nation’s most dangerous exports.

Richard Vague

Proverbial hell:: The coming wave of defaults

With COVID-related income supplements and unemployment benefits now expired or reduced, we face a new wave of mortgage and rental delinquencies, many of which will come in the next few months.

Ukraine contact is a Russian spy

Giuliani pleads ignorance on bombshell report

In a wild interview Saturday, President Donald Trump’s attorney Rudy Giuliani insisted that he had absolutely no idea that one of his key sources in his smear campaign against Joe Biden was a Russian spy interfering in the U.S. presidential election.

Shortnews

CBS News poll

Biden leads Trump Arizona, Minnesota

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden gained a small lead over President Trump in the battleground state of Arizona and holds a larger 9-point lead over the president in Minnesota, according to a new poll. Biden is backed by 47 percent of likely voters in Arizona, compared to Trump’s 44 percent, according to a CBS News poll released Sunday. Biden’s 3-point lead is within the poll’s margin error. Biden has gained on Trump in Arizona since a similar poll conducted in July found the race tied, with 46 percent of likely voters backing both candidates.

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CBS News poll

Biden leads Trump Arizona, Minnesota

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden gained a small lead over President Trump in the battleground state of Arizona and holds a larger 9-point lead over the president in Minnesota, according to a new poll. Biden is backed by 47 percent of likely voters in Arizona, compared to Trump’s 44 percent, according to a CBS News poll released Sunday. Biden’s 3-point lead is within the poll’s margin error. Biden has gained on Trump in Arizona since a similar poll conducted in July found the race tied, with 46 percent of likely voters backing both candidates.

The survey also found half of Arizona voters said they think Biden would do a better job handling the coronavirus outbreak, with 50 percent saying Biden would handle the outbreak better compared to 37 percent who said the same about Trump.

Biden also leads when asked who would make voters feel more safe, with 46 percent saying Biden and 41 percent saying Trump. The candidates were about even when asked who would do a better job handling the economy, with 45 percent saying Trump and 44 percent saying Biden, based on the poll.

In Minnesota, a state Trump narrowly lost in 2016, Biden is backed by 50 percent of likely voters, based on the poll. The survey found 41 percent of likely voters said they would vote for Trump.

Biden again led Trump when asked about the coronavirus outbreak, with 50 percent saying Biden would do a better job handling the outbreak and 36 percent saying Trump would. Additionally, 47 percent of voters in Minnesota said Biden would make them feel more safe and 42 percent said the same about Trump.

Trump has a lead over Biden when asked about handling the economy. Forty-eight percent of likely voters in Minnesota said Trump would do a better job handling the economy and 44 percent said Biden, based on the poll.

The surveys were conducted on behalf of CBS News by YouGov between Sept. 9 to Sept. 11. The Arizona poll is based on 1,22 registered votes and the margin of error is 3.8 percentage points. The Minnesota poll is based on 1,100 registered voters and has a margin of error of 3.6 percentage points.

Peter Strzok

Donald Trump is compromised by the Russians

Former FBI agent Peter Strzok told NBC’s Chuck Todd Sunday that he still believes President Trump to be “compromised by the Russians...I believed at the time in 2016 and I continue to believe that Donald Trump is compromised by the Russians,” Strzok said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “And when I say that I mean that they hold leverage over him that makes him incapable of placing the national interest, the national security ahead of his own.”

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Peter Strzok

Donald Trump is compromised by the Russians

Former FBI agent Peter Strzok told NBC’s Chuck Todd Sunday that he still believes President Trump to be “compromised by the Russians...I believed at the time in 2016 and I continue to believe that Donald Trump is compromised by the Russians,” Strzok said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “And when I say that I mean that they hold leverage over him that makes him incapable of placing the national interest, the national security ahead of his own.”

“One of the largest ways that people in foreign governments gain leverage, certainly in the case of the president, is through financial entanglements,” he added. “And I think when you take a look at the Trump financial enterprise, particularly its relationship with Russian, with Russian monies and potentially those related to organized crime and other elements, that those interactions have placed him in a position where the Russians have leverage over him and are able to influence his actions.”

Todd also questioned Strzok about the text messages between himself and FBI attorney Lisa Page, with whom he had an affair. Todd asked Strzok whether he blamed himself for “putt[ing] [himself] in a compromising position” or whether he believed he was treated unfairly.

“I certainly regret sending the text messages that were absolutely weaponized and used to bludgeon the work of the FBI, the work of the special counsel, I'll always regret that,” Strzok conceded.

However, he claimed that “the way that those were weaponized” was part of an ongoing pattern of the Trump administration purging dissenters.

“Whether it is in the impeachment hearings with regard to Ukraine, the whistleblower, or anybody in any number of federal government agencies - if somebody dares speak the truth about this administration, this administration has shown no boundaries in going after people in ways that frankly is shocking, are shocking and are inappropriate,” he said.

Election 2020

Trump says he'll put personal money into campaign

President Trump said Tuesday that he would spend his own money on his reelection campaign if it were necessary, while downplaying the need for it at this stage. “If I have to, I would, but we’re doing very well,” Trump told reporters at Joint Base Andrews before departing for a two-state trip to Florida and North Carolina. The president claimed that his campaign needed to “spend more money up front” to combat what he described as “disinformation” put forth by Democrats and the press about his administration’s handling of the novel coronavirus.

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Election 2020

Trump says he'll put personal money into campaign

President Trump said Tuesday that he would spend his own money on his reelection campaign if it were necessary, while downplaying the need for it at this stage. “If I have to, I would, but we’re doing very well,” Trump told reporters at Joint Base Andrews before departing to Florida and North Carolina. Trump claimed that his campaign needed to “spend more money up front” to combat what he described as “disinformation” put forth by Democrats and the press about his administration’s handling of the novel coronavirus.

“If we needed any more, I would put it up personally, like I did in the primaries last time,” Trump told reporters, referring to the money he put up for his 2016 campaign. “If I have to, I’ll do it here but we don’t have to because we have double and maybe even triple what we had a number of years ago, four years ago.”

Asked how much of his own money he would consider putting into the campaign, Trump replied: “Whatever it takes, we have to win.”

Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden are entering the final two-month stretch of the 2020 presidential election, with national polls showing the former vice president leading the incumbent president by significant margins.

The president’s remarks come amid reports about concerns within his campaign about a potential cash crunch two months from the election. Bloomberg reported earlier Tuesday that Trump had discussed spending up to $100 million of his own money on his 2020 campaign.

The Trump campaign and Republican National Committee built a significant war chest but have spent $800 million on the president’s reelection effort through the month of July.

Meanwhile, the Biden campaign has spent more than $400 million and nearly matched the Trump campaign in cash on hand at the end of July. The campaign and the Democratic National Committee reported last week that they raised a record $365 million in August, the largest-ever one-month fundraising haul.

The New York Times reported Monday that the Trump campaign was grappling with a potential cash crunch as the Nov. 3 election nears. The Trump campaign and RNC have yet to announce their fundraising numbers for last month, though they have disclosed that they raised $76 million during the GOP convention alone, more than the Democrats.

Meanwhile, Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien told reporters that he is “carefully managing the budget” and that the campaign is confident funding will not be an issue down the final stretch.

Earlier Tuesday, Trump defended his campaign spending, tweeting that he needed to spend “a lot of money” in order to “compensate for the false reporting and Fake News concerning our handling of the China Virus,” referring to the coronavirus pandemic.

“Now they see the GREAT job we have done, and we have 3 times more than we had 4 years ago - & are up in polls. Lots of $’s & ENERGY!” Trump tweeted.

COVID-19

Nancy Pelosi not wearing a mask

Nancy Pelosi has been photographed in a San Francisco hair salon without a face covering, breaking the city’s coronavirus prevention rules. Security camera footage, which was obtained by Fox News, shows the Democratic House speaker without a mask on her face as she walked through the salon. Salons in San Francisco have been closed during the coronavirus pandemic, with limited outdoor operations beginning only on Tuesday.

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COVID-19

Nancy Pelosi not wearing a mask

Nancy Pelosi has been photographed in a San Francisco hair salon without a face covering, breaking the city’s coronavirus prevention rules. Security camera footage, which was obtained by Fox News, shows the Democratic House speaker without a mask on her face as she walked through the salon. Salons in San Francisco have been closed during the coronavirus pandemic, with limited outdoor operations beginning only on Tuesday.

The footage, showing Pelosi walking through the eSalon with a face mask around her neck, was filmed during an appointment on Monday.

Pelosi has regularly told US citizens to wear masks and follow the guidelines intended to limit the spread of coronavirus.

The salon’s owner, Erica Kious, said one of her hairstylists who rented a chair at the business had opened it especially for Pelosi’s appointment.

“It was a slap in the face that she went in, you know, that she feels that she can just go and get her stuff done while no one else can go in, and I can’t work,” Kious told Fox News.

“We have been shut down for so long, not just me, but most of the small businesses and I just can’t – it’s a feeling – a feeling of being deflated, helpless and honestly beaten down,” she added.

Kious said that according to her interpretation of the coronavirus safety precautions blow-drying hair was prohibited for salons.

She added: “I have been fighting for six months for a business that took me 12 years to build to reopen,” she said. “I am a single mom, I have two small children, and I have no income.

“We’re supposed to look up to this woman, right? It is just disturbing.”

A spokesman for Pelosi, Drew Hammill, responded that the Californian congresswoman had not realised she was breaking her home city’s virus prevention rules.

“This business offered for the speaker to come in on Monday and told her they were allowed by the city to have one customer at a time in the business,” he said, adding: “The speaker complied with the rules as presented to her by this establishment.”

Nancy Pelosi has claimed to have been “set up”, after she was photographed in a San Francisco hair salon without a face covering, breaking the city’s coronavirus prevention rules.

“I take responsibility for trusting the word of the neighborhood salon that I’ve been to many times,” the House speaker said on Wednesday afternoon, as reported by the San Francisco Chronicle. “It was a setup, and I take responsibility for falling for a setup.”

Wahlkampfspenden

Joe Biden: 300 Millionen Dollar

US-Präsidentschaftskandidat Joe Biden hat einem Medienbericht zufolge allein im August mehr als 300 Millionen Dollar an Wahlkampfspenden erhalten. Die endgültige Summe stehe noch nicht fest, dürfte aber die höchste sein, die jemals ein Präsidentschaftskandidat innerhalb eines Monats verbuchen konnte, zitierte die „New York Times“ am Dienstag zwei mit dem Vorgang vertraute Personen. Im Juli hatte Biden 140 Millionen Dollar eingesammelt. Sein Rivale, Amtsinhaber Donald Trump, kam auf 165 Millionen Dollar.

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Wahlkampfspenden

Joe Biden: 300 Millionen Dollar

US-Präsidentschaftskandidat Joe Biden hat einem Medienbericht zufolge allein im August mehr als 300 Millionen Dollar an Wahlkampfspenden erhalten. Die endgültige Summe stehe noch nicht fest, dürfte aber die höchste sein, die jemals ein Präsidentschaftskandidat innerhalb eines Monats verbuchen konnte, zitierte die „New York Times“ am Dienstag zwei mit dem Vorgang vertraute Personen.

Im Juli hatte Biden 140 Millionen Dollar eingesammelt. Sein Rivale, Amtsinhaber Donald Trump, kam auf 165 Millionen Dollar.

Für August hat der Wahlkampfstab des Präsidenten noch keine Zahlen genannt. Ein Sprecher von Bidens Kampagne wollte vorerst keine Summe preisgeben, da sie noch nicht endgültig feststehe.

Die Wahl ist am 3. November angesetzt. Der Demokrat Biden liegt in den meisten landesweiten Umfragen vor dem Republikaner Trump.

Investigative

Damaging Hillary Clinton

Trump 'associates' offered Assange pardon

Two political figures claiming to represent Donald Trump offered Julian Assange a “win-win” deal to avoid extradition to the US and indictment, a London court has heard. Under the proposed deal, outlined by Assange’s barrister Jennifer Robinson, the WikiLeaks founder would be offered a pardon if he disclosed who leaked Democratic party emails to his site, in order to help clear up allegations they had been supplied by Russian hackers to help Trump’s election in 2016.


The Guardian

Donald Trump accused of sexual assault

A former model has come forward to accuse Donald Trump of sexually assaulting her at the US Open tennis tournament more than two decades ago, in an alleged incident that left her feeling “sick” and “violated”. In an exclusive interview with the Guardian, Amy Dorris alleged that Trump accosted her outside the bathroom in his VIP box at the tournament in New York on 5 September 1997.

"The Room Where It Happened"

DOJ has opened a criminal investigation into Bolton's book

The Department of Justice has launched a criminal investigation into the possibility that former national security adviser John Bolton "unlawfully disclosed classified information" in a memoir he published earlier this year, The New York Times reported Tuesday.


netcoo.com

Drahtzieher hinter behindmlm.com aufgeflogen?

Seit Jahren stehen fast alle Network Marketing Unternehmen im Fokus einer Internetseite, die aus der Anonymität heraus mit äußerst dubiosen Methoden agiert. Der Name der Webseite: behindmlm.com. Zehn Jahre lang war es nicht geglückt, den tatsächlichen Kopf, den Verantwortlichen hinter der Internet-Plattform ausfindig zu machen. Gerüchte, dass ein Journalist aus Deutschland mit Sitz in Taiwan dahinter stecken könnte, gab es schon vor Jahren.

Klaus Bardenhagen · behindMLM.com

A blackmailer who sells himself as a serious journalist

In the coronavirus era, business is going well for Klaus Bardenhagen. The 44-year-old journalist is one of almost a thousand Germans who live in the Taiwanese capital, Taipei. From the forecourt to China, he gladly delivers reports and background information on COVID-19. Taiwan is considered a model country for coping with the pandemic. German online media, TV stations and radio stations still rely on Klaus Bardenhagen's reports.

Election 2020

Has Trump spent his election war chest before the war really starts?

More than $180,000 per second. That is what Donald Trump’s two TV ads during the Super Bowl worked out at in February, offering vivid proof of the outsized role of money in American politics – and of his re-election campaign’s premature and profligate spending.

Andrii Derkach

U.S. sanctions Giuliani ally for involvement in election meddling

The U.S. Treasury Department imposed sanctions on three Kremlin-linked individuals and a Ukrainian lawmaker Thursday for attempting to meddle in the 2020 U.S. presidential election.

BOB Woodward · Rage

Trump disclosed secret weapons system to Woodward

President Trump bragged about a supposedly secret nuclear weapons system in an interview with Bob Woodward, according to excerpts from the veteran journalist's new book.

New Whistleblower

DHS officials sought to alter intelligence products

A whistleblower is alleging that top leaders at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) have politicized intelligence, with the political appointees pushing him to alter intelligence assessments to match President Trump's public remarks.

North Carolina attorney general

Investigations against Postmaster Louis DeJoy

North Carolina Attorney General Josh Stein (D) said Tuesday that an investigation is warranted in response to allegations that Postmaster General Louis DeJoy used his former company's funds to reimburse employees for political donations made to Republican candidates.

Washington Post exposes possible corruption

Why Louis DeJoy became the Postmaster

Louis DeJoy’s prolific campaign fundraising, which helped position him as a top Republican power broker in North Carolina and ultimately as head of the U.S. Postal Service, was bolstered for more than a decade by a practice that left many employees feeling pressured to make political contributions to GOP candidates — money DeJoy later reimbursed through bonuses, former employees say.

New York

Mayor suspends officers involved in man’s suffocation death

Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren announced the suspension of officers at a Thursday press conference. The mayor of New York's third largest city on Thursday suspended a group of police officers involved in the suffocation death of a Black man last March.

Election 2020

USPS Robert Duncan: High-level ties to Republican party

Intense scrutiny of the United States Postal Service and its likely role in November’s election is calling new attention to the chairman of the organization’s board of governors, who has deep ties to influential Republicans including the Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell.

German government confirms

Alexei Navalny poisoned with novichok

Angela Merkel has demanded answers from the Kremlin over the “attempted murder” of the Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny, after toxicological exams at Berlin’s Charité hospital indicated “unequivocally” that Navalny was poisoned with a nerve agent from the novichok family.

Facebook

As election looms, Russian trolls are targeting Americans again

People associated with the infamous St. Petersburg troll group that was part of Russia's attempt to interfere in the 2016 US presidential election are trying to target Americans again, Facebook (FB) announced Tuesday after receiving a tip from the FBI.

Shortnews

ABC News/Ipsos

Joe Biden has more respect for military than Trump

A majority of respondents said that they believe Democratic nominee Joe Biden has more respect for the military than President Trump. The ABC News/Ipsos poll found that 61 percent of respondents said Biden had more respect for the U.S. military, compared to 37 percent who said Trump had more respect. The results were split among partisan lines, with 81 percent of Republicans believing Trump has more respect for the military, and 16 percent of Republicans siding with Biden. Among Democrats, 93 percent said Biden was more respectful of the military, while 7 percent said Trump held the high ground.

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ABC News/Ipsos

Joe Biden has more respect for military than Trump

A majority of respondents said in a new poll that they believe Democratic nominee Joe Biden has more respect for the military than President Trump. The ABC News/Ipsos poll found that 61 percent of respondents said Biden had more respect for the U.S. military, compared to 37 percent who said Trump had more respect. The results were split among partisan lines, with 81 percent of Republicans believing Trump has more respect for the military, and 16 percent of Republicans siding with Biden. Among Democrats, 93 percent said Biden was more respectful of the military, while 7 percent said Trump held the high ground.

Most independents stood with Biden, with 65 percent saying he had a higher respect for the military, compared to 35 percent of independents who said Trump did.

The ABC News/Ipsos poll surveyed 533 adults in the U.S. between Sept. 11 and 12. The margin of error amounted to 4.7 percentage points.

The poll was conducted after Trump faced controversy when The Atlantic published a report that said the president made several disparaging comments about slain military members. Trump has repeatedly denied the allegations.

The Atlantic cited multiple sources when reporting the president canceled a 2018 trip to the Aisne-Marne American Cemetery in France, where Americans who died in World War I are buried, due to concerns about his hair getting ruined in the rain.

He reportedly asked senior staff, “Why should I go to that cemetery? It’s filled with losers.”

Almost 2 in 3 Americans disapprove of Trump's handling of pandemic:...
Biden leads by 5 points nationally in Fox News poll
The sources also said Trump called the U.S. Marines killed at Belleau Wood during the war “suckers” because they had died.

The Associated Press and Fox News have said they confirmed at least some of the reporting.

But the White House has stood by the president, saying at least 25 former and current officials said on the record they did not hear the comments reported in The Atlantic.

Prison Suizide

Inmate found dead with face mask tied around his neck

A Connecticut prison inmate was found dead this week with a cloth mask intended to prevent the spread of the coronavirus tied around his neck. His death was ruled as a suicide by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner. Daniel Ocasio, 32, was found early on Wednesday with a ligature around his neck. "The ligature was made from the cloth mask issued to the offender population to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus," the statement added. Prison staff tried to help Ocasio by giving him medical attention before he was sent to a hospital and pronounced dead.

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Prison Suizide

Inmate found dead with face mask tied around his neck

A Connecticut prison inmate was found dead this week with a cloth mask intended to prevent the spread of the coronavirus tied around his neck. His death was ruled as a suicide by the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner.

Daniel Ocasio, 32, was found early on Wednesday with a ligature around his neck. "The ligature was made from the cloth mask issued to the offender population to prevent the spread of the novel coronavirus," the statement added.

Prison staff tried to help Ocasio by giving him medical attention before he was sent to a hospital and pronounced dead.

Ocasio was a resident of Windsor, Ct. He had been an inmate at the prison facility since August 5 over charges of third-degree burglary, the DOC said.

His bond was set at $10,000, and it is unclear whether he was seeking legal counsel.

His death comes as the prison population has proven to be at an elevated risk of contracting the novel COVID-19 virus due to the close quarters inmates share.

According to an analysis published by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, the infection rate among inmates is reportedly 5.5 times higher than in the overall U.S. population.

Over 1,300 inmates in Connecticut prisons have tested positive for COVID-19 since the outbreak began in the U.S., the DOC reported.

Following Ocasio's death, the American Civil Liberties Union called for a "full investigation" into the Department of Corrections regarding the situation.

"Daniel Ocasio should still be alive today, and the DOC had a duty to prevent his death," ACLU of Connecticut Executive Director David McGuire said in a statement Friday.

Banevicius told CNN that the DOC investigation is ongoing and did not provide further deatils. However, he added that, "it is saddening and unfortunate when anyone makes the conscious decision to take their own life," he said.

Philipp Amthor

Keine Bestechlichkeit

Die Generalstaatsanwaltschaft Berlin sieht beim CDU-Bundestagsabgeordneten Philipp Amthor keinen Anfangsverdacht einer Bestechlichkeit und einer Bestechung von Mandatsträgern. Das Verfahren wurde eingestellt, ohne Ermittlungen aufzunehmen. Amthor war wegen seiner Nebentätigkeit und Lobbyarbeit für das US-amerikanische IT-Unternehmen Augustus Intelligence in die Kritik geraten. Der 27-Jährige hat die Zusammenarbeit nach eigenen Angaben inzwischen beendet. Seine Kandidatur für den CDU-Vorsitz in Mecklenburg-Vorpommern zog er zurück.

Carlos Ghosn

Befragung im Libanon

Carlos Ghosn will an seinem Aufenthaltsort Beirut im Libanon befragt werden: "Mein Pass ist in den Händen des Generalstaatsanwalts im Libanon, da Japan einen internationalen Haftbefehl gegen mich ausgestellt hat." Japan bemüht sich um die Auslieferung. Ghosn verlangt Sicherheit. Der Architekt des französisch-japanischen Autobündnisses Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi war am 19. November 2018 in Tokio unter anderem wegen Verstoßes gegen Börsenauflagen festgenommen und angeklagt worden. Im April 2019 wurde er auf Kaution entlassen. Ghosn floh in einem Privatjet nach Beirut. Ghosn hatte die Vorwürfe gegen ihn in Japan mehrmals zurückgewiesen.

Wirecard

Ermittlungen wegen Geldwäscheverdacht

Die Staatsanwaltschaft München ermittelt nun auch wegen des Verdachts auf Geldwäsche. Die Ermittlungen richteten sich gegen Verantwortliche des Unternehmens und Unbekannt. Die Staatsanwaltschaft prüfe entsprechende Anzeigen aus dem laufenden und aus dem vergangenen Jahr. DWirecard lehnte eine Stellungnahme ab. In der Wirecard-Bilanz fehlen 1,9 Milliarden Euro. Als erster Dax-Konzern musste das Unternehmen Insolvenz anmelden. Der frühere Wirecard-Chef Markus Braun hatte sich der Justiz gestellt und wurde festgenommen, kam aber gegen Kaution wieder frei.

highest-profile celebrity relationship

Cardi B files for divorce from rapper Offset

Cardi B has filed for divorce from rapper husband Offset. The filing was made in Georgia, with an initial hearing set for 4 November.

Movies / TV

Diana Rigg, Avengers and Game of Thrones star, dies aged 82

The actor Diana Rigg, known for her roles on stage and in film and television – including The Avengers and On Her Majesty’s Secret Service – has died at the age of 82.

Evelyn Yang

Gynecologist accused of sexual abuse

Former New York gynecologist Robert Hadden, who has been accused of sexually abusing more than two dozen patients, including the wife of former presidential candidate Andrew Yang, is now facing federal charges.

'Batman' production halted

Robert Pattinson tests positive for coronavirus

Filming of Warner Bros.’ “The Batman” movie has been temporarily paused after lead actor Robert Pattinson tested positive for the coronavirus.

Netflix

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle sign multi-year deal

Under the new partnership, the couple will produce documentaries, feature films and scripted shows for the streaming platform, further details of which are yet to emerge.

Copyright Complaint

Eddy Grant sues Trump campaign over use of song

Musician Eddy Grant sued President Trump's re-election campaign on Tuesday, alleging that it was infringing on his copyrights to the hit song "Electric Avenue."

I Like to Move It

DJ Erick Morillo found dead in Florida

DJ Erick Morillo has been found dead in Florida at the age of 49, police have said.

Ron Jeremy, The Hedgehog

Sex film star charged with 20 new rape and sexual assault counts

The adult film star Ron Jeremy was charged on Monday with 20 new counts of rape or sexual assault involving 12 women and a teenage girl, the Los Angeles district attorney’s office said.

MTV VMAs 2020

Lady Gaga dominates during unusual pandemic broadcast

Lady Gaga dominated an unusual year for the MTV Video Music awards, winning five awards in a strange and disconcerting evening.

Chadwick Boseman

He was. the superhero so desperately needed

For many Black people, Chadwick Boseman really was T'Challa.

Bipolar political disorder

Kanye West is breaking campaign finance law

By not filing campaign finance forms with the Federal Election Commission, West's campaign is hiding expenditures from public view.

24Plus

US young adults on the Holocaust

Nearly two-thirds unaware 6m Jews killed

Almost two-thirds of young American adults do not know that 6 million Jews were killed during the Holocaust, and more than one in 10 believe Jews caused the Holocaust, a new survey has found, revealing shocking levels of ignorance about the greatest crime of the 20th century.


Pew Research Center

Donald Trump is the least trusted major world leader

The image of the US and Donald Trump around the world has plunged from poor to the abysmal over the administration’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic, according to a global survey.

How Trumps incapacity is explained

Woodward tapes 'reveal strong leadership' on Covid

The revelation that Donald Trump deliberately downplayed the coronavirus pandemic forced key aides on to desperate defence on Sunday, barely 50 days from the presidential election.


California

Explosive wildfires stoked by fierce winds

Wildfires raged unchecked across parts of the western U.S. on Wednesday amid gusty and dry conditions, but forecasters said some weather relief was in sight that could help firefighters overwhelmed by the blazes.

Dr. Anthony Fauci

Trump official preventing Fauci from discussing Covid children risk

A health official hired by a Donald Trump appointee has been working to prevent Dr Anthony Fauci from talking about dangers that Covid-19 poses to children, Politico reported on Wednesday.

Michael Cohen Book

Donald Trump: “Fuck Mandela. He was no leader”

The impression of Donald Trump’s obsession with his predecessor Barack Obama was fueled by a video from 2012 resurfacing this weekend from a parody in which the now-Republican president mocks his Democratic rival.

Black Live Matter

Michael Reinoeh, suspect in Portland slaying killed

A vocal proponent of the far-left antifa movement who was suspected of fatally shooting a supporter of a far-right group in Portland, Ore., this weekend was shot and killed in a confrontation with law enforcement Thursday, the U.S. Marshals Service said.

Civil Rights

NSA surveillance exposed by Snowden was illegal

Seven years after former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden blew the whistle on the mass surveillance of Americans’ telephone records, an appeals court has found the program was unlawful – and that the US intelligence leaders who publicly defended it were not telling the truth.

For Donald Trump these are terrorists

US imposes sanctions on top international criminal court officials

The US has imposed sanctions on the chief prosecutor of the international criminal court, Fatou Bensouda, in the latest of a series of unilateral and radical foreign policy moves.

COVID-19

Task force reports show dire US-reality

As President Donald Trump was painting a positive picture of the coronavirus pandemic and urging states to reopen the nation's businesses and schools, data from the White House coronavirus task force released Monday shows he was getting increasingly dire reports about the spread of the pandemic in July and August.

Hurricane Laura

Donald Trump visits storm-lashed Louisiana and Texas

Donald Trump got a first-hand look on Saturday at hurricane damage to south-west Louisiana, two days after Hurricane Laura roared in off the Gulf of Mexico with winds up to 150mph, killing at least 15 people, knocking out power and causing extensive flooding and lack of running water across several towns.

Jacob Blake

NBA players decide to continue season

The NBA has apparently moved back from the brink after speculation had mounted that players would boycott the season over the police shooting of Jacob Blake.

Covid red alert

Nice: Tour de France in doubt

The 2020 Tour de France, scheduled to start in Nice on Saturday, is edging closer to collapse after the Alpes-Maritimes region, site of the opening stages of the race, was placed on red alert owing to the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic.

Shortnews

Dr. Anthony Fauci

Vaccine is ‘unlikely’ by U.S. election

White House coronavirus advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci said Tuesday a coronavirus vaccine probably won’t be ready by the U.S. presidential election even as the Centers for Disease and Prevention asks states to ready distribution facilities by Nov. 1. At a health conference, Fauci said it’s more likely a vaccine will be ready by “the end of the year” as drug companies Moderna and Pfizer race to complete patient enrollment for their late-stage vaccine trials by the end of September.

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Dr. Anthony Fauci

Vaccine is ‘unlikely’ by U.S. election

White House coronavirus advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci said Tuesday a coronavirus vaccine probably won’t be ready by the U.S. presidential election even as the Centers for Disease and Prevention asks states to ready distribution facilities by Nov. 1.

At a health conference, Fauci said it’s more likely a vaccine will be ready by “the end of the year” as drug companies Moderna and Pfizer race to complete patient enrollment for their late-stage vaccine trials by the end of September.

“It’s unlikely we’ll have a definitive answer” by the Nov. 3 election, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said at the Research! America 2020 National Health Research Forum.

The comments are also at odds with President Donald Trump, who suggested at a press conference Monday that a vaccine could be ready for distribution by Election Day.

UFO Investigation

Pentagon forms new task force

The Pentagon is forming a new task force to investigate UFO sightings that have been observed on several occasions by U.S. military aircraft. The creation of the Unidentified Aerial Phenomena Task Force, or UAPTF, continues an effort begun in recent years to investigate unexplained aerial incidents encountered by the U.S. military. “The Department of Defense established the UAPTF to improve its understanding of, and gain insight into, the nature and origins of UAPs. The mission of the task force is to detect, analyze and catalog UAPs that could potentially pose a threat to U.S. national security,” the Pentagon wrote in a statement late Friday.

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UFO Investigation

Pentagon forms new task force

The Pentagon is forming a new task force to investigate UFO sightings that have been observed on several occasions by U.S. military aircraft. The creation of the Unidentified Aerial Phenomena Task Force, or UAPTF, continues an effort begun in recent years to investigate unexplained aerial incidents encountered by the U.S. military.

“The Department of Defense established the UAPTF to improve its understanding of, and gain insight into, the nature and origins of UAPs. The mission of the task force is to detect, analyze and catalog UAPs that could potentially pose a threat to U.S. national security,” the Pentagon wrote in a statement late Friday.

“The Department of Defense and the military departments take any incursions by unauthorized aircraft into our training ranges or designated airspace very seriously and examine each report. This includes examinations of incursions that are initially reported as UAP when the observer cannot immediately identify what he or she is observing,” the statement added.

The new task force will be overseen by the Department of the Navy and will report to the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence and Security. The U.S. Navy has previously led efforts to look into unidentified aerial phenomena since the service branch has reported several encounters involving their aircraft.

In April, the Pentagon declassified three videos captured by U.S. Navy pilots that appear to show unidentified flying objects. Two of the videos contain U.S. service members commenting on how quickly the object moves while another speculates that the unidentifiable object could be a drone.

“Dude, this is a f--king drone, bro,” one pilot is heard saying. Another says “there’s a whole fleet of them.”

“They’re all going against the wind. The wind’s 120 knots to the west. Look at that thing, dude!” the first person says. “It’s rotating!”

President Donald Trump has previously described the U.S. Navy footage as “a hell of a video” and told Reuters that he wonders “if it’s real.”

In June, the Senate Intelligence Committee voted that the Pentagon as well as intelligence community leaders should provide a public analysis of the encounters.

England

Jürgen Klopp zum Fußball-Manager des Jahres gewählt

Jürgen Klopp ist nach dem Gewinn der Meisterschaft mit dem FC Liverpool von seinen Trainerkollegen zum Fußball-Manager des Jahres in England gewählt worden. Der Coach erhielt die Sir Alex Ferguson Trophy für seine herausragenden Leistungen. Klopp hatte Liverpool in der abgelaufenen Saison zum ersten Meistertitel seit 30 Jahren geführt. "Das ist sehr besonders für mich, weil ich von meinen Kollegen gewählt worden bin", sagte Klopp. Ferguson, der einst Manchester United zur Weltmarke formte, hob die "außerordentliche" Leistung von Klopps Team hervor. "Du hast es absolut verdient".

Fussball England

Lovren und Lallana verlassen Liverpool

Der kroatische Nationalspieler Dejan Lovren und Adam Lallana verlassen den von Jürgen Klopp trainierten englischen Fußballmeister FC Liverpool. Nach sechs Jahren bei den Reds wechselt der 31 Jahre alte Innenverteidiger Lovren in die russische Premjer-Liga zu Zenit St. Petersburg. Das gaben beide Clubs bekannt. Beim russischen Meister unterschrieb Lovren einen Dreijahresvertrag bis 2023. Lallana zieht es indes zu Brighton and Hove Albion. Beim Premier-League-15. erhält der 32-Jährige einen Dreijahresvertrag.

USA Today

Peter Navarro’s op-ed on Dr Anthony Fauci “misleading.”

Bill Sternberg added a note to the top of the op-ed saying the editors chose to publish the op-ed because it was “newsworthy,” considering the White House’s recent attacks on Fauci’s credibility. But Sternberg added, “However, several of Navarro’s criticisms of Fauci — on the China travel restrictions, the risk from the coronavirus and falling mortality rates — were misleading or lacked context. As such, Navarro’s op-ed did not meet USA TODAY’s fact-checking standards.” Navarro said Fauci, the government’s top infectious disease expert, had been “wrong about everything I have interacted with him on.”

Business

COVID-19

Wealth of US billionaires rises by nearly a third

The already vast fortunes of America’s 643 billionaires have soared by an average of 29% since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, which has at the same time laid waste to tens of millions of jobs around the world. The richest of the superrich have benefited by $845bn , according to a report by a US progressive thinktank, the Institute for Policy Studies. The report calculated that 643 billionaires had racked up $845bn in collective wealth gains since 18 March.


Federeal Reserve Bank

Judy Shelton: Trump's controversial pick

Senate Republican leaders don’t yet have 51 votes to confirm President Trump’s controversial pick to the Federal Reserve, Judy Shelton, whose nomination is facing strong opposition from prominent economists.

S&P 500

Tesla falls 21%, worst single-day loss in its history

Tesla shares tumbled Tuesday, after Elon Musk’s electric vehicle maker was left out of the S&P 500 by the committee that decides on new additions to the index.


The Atlantic's editor-in-chief Jeffrey Goldberg

Story about Trump calling vets 'losers' is just the beginning

Jeffrey Goldberg, editor-in-chief of The Atlantic, said his magazine's story about Trump calling Americans who died in battle "losers" and "suckers," was just the tip of the iceberg.

Jennifer Griffin

Trump calls for Fox News journalist to be fired

The row over Donald Trump’s alleged remarks denigrating American soldiers has now seen the US president target one of his core areas of support as he called for a Fox News journalist who reported details of the scandal to be fired.

Stars and Stripes

Outcry as Pentagon orders newspaper to shut down

The Trump administration has ordered the closure of Stars and Stripes, a newspaper that has served US armed forces since 1861, according to a Pentagon memo obtained by USA Today.

The housing market in times of COVID-19

How the Pandemic Gold Rush is remaking the housing market

It may seem counterintuitive that a pandemic-fueled recession could lead to a bullish housing market. But a combination of trends has resulted in a buying frenzy.

Congressional Budget Office (CBO)

Deficit to reach record $3.3 trillion

The federal deficit is expected to reach a record $3.3 trillion this year, more than twice the largest level on record, but lower than earlier estimates, according to new Congressional Budget Office (CBO) projections.

Cybersecutity

Hackers test defenses of Trump campaign websites

Hackers have stepped up efforts to knock Trump campaign and business websites offline ahead of the U.S. election, in what a security firm working for the campaign said could be preparation for a larger digital assault, according to emails seen by Reuters.

Fox News

Tucker Carlson defends actions of teen charged in Kenosha killings

The rightwing Fox News host Tucker Carlson has defended the actions of a 17-year-old who was arrested and charged with murder after two people were killed in Kenosha, Wisconsin, as white vigilante agitators shot at Black Lives Matter protesters.

Joe Scarborough

‘Morning Joe’ host calls Melania Trump ‘absolutely shameless’

MSNBC host Joe Scarborough had two words to describe Melania Trump’s speech at the Republican National Convention: “Absolutely shameless.”

Wall Street

Business world braces for blue sweep

Wall Street and business groups are bracing for the possibility of a blue sweep in Washington that would leave Democrats in charge of the White House and both chambers of Congress.

TikTok

Company will challenge Trump order banning U.S. transactions

TikTok plans to sue the Trump administration as early as next week over the president’s executive order banning U.S. transactions with the popular video-sharing app and its Chinese parent ByteDance, the company confirmed.

Shortnews

Palantir

Valued around $10.5 billion ahead of direct listing

As Palantir gears up for its stock market debut, the company has a long way to go to convince potential shareholders that it’s worth the $20 billion price tag that investors gave it almost five years ago. Palantir held a virtual event for investors on Wednesday. The company, whose software helps government agencies and large corporations make sense of vast amounts of data, also released an updated prospectus, indicating that the number of shares outstanding increased in the third quarter, to 1.64 billion from 1.53 billion in the prior period.

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Palantir

Valued around $10.5 billion ahead of direct listing

As Palantir gears up for its stock market debut, the company has a long way to go to convince potential shareholders that it’s worth the $20 billion price tag that investors gave it almost five years ago. Palantir held a virtual event for investors on Wednesday. The company, whose software helps government agencies and large corporations make sense of vast amounts of data, also released an updated prospectus, indicating that the number of shares outstanding increased in the third quarter, to 1.64 billion from 1.53 billion in the prior period.

Based on an average share price transaction in the latest quarter of $6.45, investors are valuing the company at just over $10.5 billion.

In July, Palantir raised $410.5 million by selling shares at $4.75 a piece, according to the filing, which comes out to a valuation of about $7.8 billion. Transactions during the quarter took place at anywhere from $4.17 a share to $11.50 a share, suggesting a range of $6.83 billion to $18.8 billion.

The math gets even fuzzier when considering that Palantir had a reported valuation of $20.4 billion in 2015, when the share price was $11.38. That price, based on the supplied share count as of Sept. 1, would indicate a current valuation of $18.6 billion.

What’s clear is that most investors see a company that’s worth closer to $10 billion than $20 billion. If Palantir’s direct listing values it at around the average private market price, the stock will trade at about 10 times revenue, a healthy ratio but less than one-fourth the price-to-sales multiple for companies like Zoom, Datadog, Shopify and Zscaler.

In the first half of 2020, Palantir’s total revenue jumped 49% to $481.2 million, with just over half its sales coming from government customers. Costs for sales and marketing and research and development dropped, allowing Palantir to narrow its net loss to $164.7 million from $280.5 million.

But Palantir remains a very expensive product that hardly anyone uses — the opposite of Zoom or Slack. It’s not an easy-to-use application that employees try out with a small team and then convince their colleagues to adopt. Rather, Palantir describes its technology as the “central operating system” that companies use for their data.

American Airlines

Employees may wear Black Lives Matter pins

American Airlines will permit its employees to wear Black Lives Matter pins while on the job, a spokesperson confirmed on Tuesday. Several Black employees of American Airlines asked if they could wear Black Lives Matter pins after seeing workers at other airlines wearing them. “In light of the appropriate attention to lives of Black Americans, we will allow team members who wish to wear a Black Lives Matter pin to do so if they choose,” American Airlines announced.

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American Airlines

Employees may wear Black Lives Matter pins

American Airlines will permit its employees to wear Black Lives Matter pins while on the job, a spokesperson confirmed on Tuesday. Several Black employees of American Airlines asked if they could wear Black Lives Matter pins after seeing workers at other airlines wearing them.

“In light of the appropriate attention to lives of Black Americans, we will allow team members who wish to wear a Black Lives Matter pin to do so if they choose,” American Airlines announced.

“Fundamentally, we believe Black Lives Matter is an expression of equality, not a political statement,” she added. “It doesn’t mean other lives don’t matter, rather that in our society Black lives should matter and be valued the same as others.”

The airline will work with Black employees to design the pin.

American Airlines permits its employees to wear up to three pins, including a single Employee Business Resource Groups pin. The airline has developed pins for different groups, including Christian, veteran and LGBTQ groups, among others.

The airline joins several other companies including Delta Air Lines and Starbucks in allowing workers to wear a pin backing the movement.

Starbucks initially banned employees from wearing anything in support of Black Lives Matter in June, shortly after protests erupted over the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis in late May.

But the corporation backtracked on its decision within a week and developed a T-shirt for its employees to wear.

There was a mixed reaction on the American Airlines’ decision on social media, with several people labeling Black Lives Matter as a “Marxist” or a “terrorist organization.”

President Trump called Black Lives Matter a “Marxist organization” during an interview last week with Fox News host Laura Ingraham and said the movement is “bad for Black people.”

The president had encouraged a boycott against Goodyear Tire after a local NBC News affiliate in Topeka, Kan., reported that the company named “Black Lives Matter” and “Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender pride” as an acceptable slogan to wear, while listing “Blue Lives Matter,” “All Lives Matter” and “MAGA attire” as “unacceptable.”

Mark Zuckerberg

Failure to take down Kenosha militia group

Mark Zuckerberg acknowledged that Facebook failed to take down a page and event calling for an armed response to anti-police brutality protests in Kenosha, Wis., despite users reporting them. The Facebook CEO said during a Q&A with employees Friday that was later posted onto this public page that “it was largely an operational mistake. It's because the team that enforces our policy against dangerous organizations is a specialized team,” he explained.

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Mark Zuckerberg

Failure to take down Kenosha militia group

Mark Zuckerberg acknowledged that Facebook failed to take down a page and event calling for an armed response to anti-police brutality protests in Kenosha, Wis., despite users reporting them. The Facebook CEO said during a Q&A with employees Friday that was later posted onto this public page that “it was largely an operational mistake. It's because the team that enforces our policy against dangerous organizations is a specialized team,” he explained.

“The contractors and the reviewers who the initial complaints were funneled to basically didn't pick this up, and on second review, doing it more sensitively, the team … that's responsible for dangerous organizations recognized that this violated the policies and we took it down.”

Facebook on Wednesday took down a page for the “Kenosha Guard” and an event promoted by the page called "Armed Citizens to Protect our Lives" for violating the platform’s policy against militia organizations.

The night before it was removed, during protests over the police shooting of a 29-year-old Black man, Jacob Blake, two people were shot dead and another was injured.

Police have charged Kyle Rittenhouse, 17, in connection with the shooting.

A spokesperson for Facebook told The Hill at the time that there was no evidence that Rittenhouse “followed the Kenosha Guard Page or that he was invited on the Event Page they organized.”

Facebook’s failure to take down a page which asked if “any patriots [are] willing to take up arms and defend our city tonight from the evil thugs?” before violence happened falls into a predictable and dangerous pattern for the platform, according to Color of Change Executive Director Rashad Robinson.

“They are never ready for these things,” the head of the civil rights advocacy group told The Hill in an interview. “You’re telling me that they just weren’t ready for this idea of a white nationalist militia rising up?”

Color of Change, along with several other civil rights groups, has been escalating its criticism of Facebook’s handling of hateful and violent content for months.

The organizations put together an advertising boycott that hundreds of businesses signed onto, and have had several discussions with the platform’s leadership concerning concrete steps they say it should take.

Issues with dealing with this content were also highlighted in an independent civil rights audit released last month, which criticized Facebook for failing to develop a mechanism for protecting civil rights and for a hands-off approach when it comes to free speech, even in cases of violent posts.

Internal criticism of Facebook leadership’s approach to violence fomented on its platform has also grown, especially after the platform left up a post from President Trump saying that “when the looting starts, the shooting starts” in response to protests over the police killing of George Floyd.

Multiple employees have been publicly critical of Zuckerberg. BuzzFeed News reported that during Friday’s employee Q&A, staffers questioned the CEO’s decision-making and approach to violent content.

“At what point do we take responsibility for enabling hate filled bile to spread across our services?” one employee reportedly wrote in the live chat. “[A]nti semitism, conspiracy, and white supremacy reeks across our services.”

Facebook has taken some steps to address hateful and dangerous groups on its platform.

Earlier this month, it expanded its policy on violent rhetoric to crackdown on groups affiliated with the baseless QAnon conspiracy theory as well as militia and anarchist groups.

For Robinson, those changes miss the heart of the problem.

Facebook needs to change the “incentive structures inside their platform,” he said, hitting the company for prioritizing profit over safety.

Commerce Department

U.S. consumer spending rose more slowly

U.S. consumers boosted their spending in July, but more slowly than in prior months as new coronavirus infections rose and the expiration of enhanced unemployment checks loomed. Spending numbers have come back more than the economy as a whole, with the help of a lot of fiscal support. The question going forward is as fiscal support wanes, to what extent will it weaken.” Personal-consumption expenditures, a measure of household spending on everything from haircuts to new cars, increased a seasonally adjusted 1.9% in July from the prior month, the Commerce Department said Friday.

US Economy

Weekly jobless claims jump back above 1 million

The number of people filing for unemployment benefits last week was greater than expected, raising concern about the state of the economy as lawmakers struggle to move forward on a new coronavirus stimulus package. The Labor Department said initial jobless claims for the week ending Aug. 15 came in at 1.106 million. Economists polled by Dow Jones expected a total of 923,000. Initial claims for the previous week were also revised higher by 8,000 to 971,000. Last week’s spike in claims came as Democrats and Republicans struggle to move forward on a new coronavirus stimulus bill.

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US Economy

Weekly jobless claims jump back above 1 million

The number of people filing for unemployment benefits last week was greater than expected, raising concern about the state of the economy as lawmakers struggle to move forward on a new coronavirus stimulus package.

The Labor Department said initial jobless claims for the week ending Aug. 15 came in at 1.106 million. Economists polled by Dow Jones expected a total of 923,000. Initial claims for the previous week were also revised higher by 8,000 to 971,000.

Last week’s spike in claims came as Democrats and Republicans struggle to move forward on a new coronavirus stimulus bill.

Democratic lawmakers want to keep an additional unemployment benefit of $600 per week that was included in previous aid package. Republicans, meanwhile, have indicated they want to extend the additional benefit at a lower rate.

Companies

Apple

Tech giant unveils new watch series 6

Apple showed off its latest smartwatch with faster computing power and an ability to measure blood oxygen as well as updated iPads on Tuesday as interest rises in such devices among homebound users looking for help tracking exercise and logging hours of remote work and learning.


Mike Bloomberg

$100m to help Biden beat Trump in Florida

The former New York mayor and candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination Mike Bloomberg will spend at least $100m to support Joe Biden in Florida, in an attempt to counter any infusion of personal cash by Donald Trump and to seek a decisive victory in early voting.

mismanaging the coronavirus crisis

LVMH plans to sue Tiffany over troubled deal

Louis Vuitton owner LVMH said Thursday it intends to file a lawsuit against Tiffany. The news comes a day after after Tiffany sued LVMH for trying to get out of a $16.2 billion deal to buy the upscale jewelry chain. LVMH said Tiffany has mismanaged the coronavirus crisis and called its recent financials “very disappointing.”


What we learn from history

Why Apple's success story can come to an end

Many investors seem to believe that today’s giant technology companies will dominate the stock market for decades to come. Years, maybe. Decades, probably not.

Stock markets tumble

Investors sell off tech stock amid US job fears

Stock markets have lost some of their spectacular gains made over the past several months, as investors sold off high-flying tech companies and worried about the continuing crisis in the US jobs market.

T-Mobile

CEO privately argues against Trump's reelection

But Mike Sievert also has a warning for Trump's critics, cautioning Democrats in a Facebook post last week against extreme-sounding rhetoric that could help the president in November.

Wirecard

Ermittler prüfen Millionenkredit zwischen Vorständen

Im Bilanzskandal um den Zahlungsdienstleister Wirecard nimmt die Staatsanwaltschaft München ein millionenschweres Darlehen zwischen den früheren Vorständen Markus Braun und Jan Marsalek unter die Lupe.

COVID-19

New layoffs make job reductions permanent

A new wave of layoffs is washing over the U.S. as several big companies reassess staffing plans and settle in for a long period of uncertainty.

Wirecard

Betrugsskandal kostet über 700 Mitarbeiter den Job

Der Betrugsskandal bei Wirecard hat jetzt auch für zahlreiche Mitarbeiter des Zahlungsdienstleisters Konsequenzen. Rund 730 von insgesamt 1.300 Beschäftigte wird gekündigt, teilte Insolvenzverwalter Michael Jaffé am Dienstag mit. Auch alle Vorstände werden entlassen.

Trump Organization

Judge to order Eric Trump’s testimony under oath

The New York State attorney general’s office has asked a judge to order Eric Trump to provide testimony under oath and the Trump Organization to hand over documents about four Trump properties it is investigating, asserting the company has stalled the inquiry for months, court papers show.

Wirecard

Ermittler erhöhen Druck auf verbliebene Vorstände

Die Staatsanwaltschaft prüft den Vorwurf der Untreue gegen Alexander von Knoop und Susanne Steidl. Sie äußern sich dazu nicht – und kommen weiter ins Büro. Mitarbeiter schildern gespenstische Szenen.

Tesla

Elon Musk becomes world's fourth richest man

Elon Musk has soared through the global wealth league this year and become the world’s fourth richest person, after a boom in the share price of the Tesla car company he co-founded and part-owns increased his wealth by more than $13.3bn in two days of trading.

USPS Louis DeJoy

Postmaster general says he's pausing changes 'until after the election'

The postmaster general on Tuesday said he would pause changes to the operations of the Postal Service until after the election amid bipartisan outcry, a sharp reversal after President Trump spent days defending the agency's actions.

Shortnews

COVID-19: USA

Goldman Sachs announces return to work

Goldman Sachs is going back to work. The banking giant told staff on Wednesday that it would start letting people back into its offices in the coming weeks after shutting most of them down in March amid the coronavirus pandemic. In a memo to staff, Goldman’s chief executive officer, David Solomon, said staff around the world would soon be notified of plans to allow people to return to their offices. Staff will return on a rotational basis in some offices and the plans will vary depending on local, business and personal circumstances.

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COVID-19: USA

Goldman Sachs announces return to work

Goldman Sachs is going back to work. The banking giant told staff on Wednesday that it would start letting people back into its offices in the coming weeks after shutting most of them down in March amid the coronavirus pandemic. In a memo to staff, Goldman’s chief executive officer, David Solomon, said staff around the world would soon be notified of plans to allow people to return to their offices. Staff will return on a rotational basis in some offices and the plans will vary depending on local, business and personal circumstances.

“Over the coming days and weeks, colleagues in those offices will hear from their divisional, business and/or local leadership about what to expect for the months ahead, including team rotations in the office where possible, with the goal of giving everyone who can do so an opportunity to come in to their office,” Solomon said.

“Importantly, this rotational approach will not look the same for everyone, as we each navigate unique personal responsibilities – for example, planning around adjusted school schedules, managing personal and family health conditions, and not being comfortable commuting to the office during peak hours, among many other considerations,” Solomon said.

JP Morgan announced similar plans last month and is planning to allow staff to cycle between days at the office and at home. But while the banks are making moves to return to a situation closer to their pre-pandemic working arrangements, JP Morgan has estimated a quarter of its close to 61,000 staff could still be working from home for the foreseeable future.

Six biggest tech stocks

More than $1 trillion in value lost in three days

The six biggest tech stocks have lost more than $1 trillion over the last three days alone, but it’s really just a dent coming off a huge rally that peaked last week. Apple, which hit a $2 trillion market cap on Aug. 19, is down about $325 billion in that time period. Microsoft’s down $219 billion, Amazon fell $191 billion, Alphabet cratered by $135 billion, and Tesla, which fell 21% on Tuesday to mark its worst single-day loss in its history, is down $109 billion in the last three days.

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Six biggest tech stocks

More than $1 trillion in value lost in three days

The six biggest tech stocks have lost more than $1 trillion over the last three days alone, but it’s really just a dent coming off a huge rally that peaked last week. Apple, which hit a $2 trillion market cap on Aug. 19, is down about $325 billion in that time period. Microsoft’s down $219 billion, Amazon fell $191 billion, Alphabet cratered by $135 billion, and Tesla, which fell 21% on Tuesday to mark its worst single-day loss in its history, is down $109 billion in the last three days.

Finally, Facebook is off by $89 billion.

“In general, if you think about the market cap loss over the last 3 days for Apple, it’s about $325 billion. To help put that in perspective, that’s about 1.5 Salesforces, and equivalent to Apple’s projected revenues for the next calendar year,” Jefferies’ Jared Weisfeld told CNBC’s “Fast Money” on Tuesday.

Despite the huge number, it’s worth keeping in perspective given the tech giants’ massive rise in value this year.

At the beginning of 2020, the six largest tech companies were worth about $5 trillion. On Wednesday, Sept. 2, they peaked with a value of $8.2 trillion. After Tuesday’s close, they have a combined market cap of $7.1 trillion. While it’s a big loss over a few days, these six companies are still worth $2.1 trillion more than they were at the beginning of the year -- despite the global coronavirus pandemic and record job losses in the U.S.

Apple

Epic Games’ App Store account suspended

Apple on Friday said it suspended Epic Games’ developer account. It follows a temporary restraining order on Monday evening, in which a judge ruled that Apple can block Fortnite but not Epic’s developer account. However, Apple said it terminated an Epic developer account that does not include the Unreal Engine that’s used by third-party developers to make 3D games, which keeps the move in line with the judge’s order. ″We are disappointed that we have had to terminate the Epic Games account on the App Store. We have worked with the team at Epic Games for many years on their launches and releases,” Apple said.

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Apple

Epic Games’ App Store account suspended

Apple on Friday said it suspended Epic Games’ developer account. It follows a temporary restraining order on Monday evening, in which a judge ruled that Apple can block Fortnite but not Epic’s developer account.

However, Apple said it terminated an Epic developer account that does not include the Unreal Engine that’s used by third-party developers to make 3D games, which keeps the move in line with the judge’s order.

″We are disappointed that we have had to terminate the Epic Games account on the App Store. We have worked with the team at Epic Games for many years on their launches and releases,” Apple said.

“The court recommended that Epic comply with the App Store guidelines while their case moves forward, guidelines they’ve followed for the past decade until they created this situation. Epic has refused. Instead they repeatedly submit Fortnite updates designed to violate the guidelines of the App Store.

This is not fair to all other developers on the App Store and is putting customers in the middle of their fight. We hope that we can work together again in the future, but unfortunately that is not possible today.”

An Epic Games spokesperson pointed CNBC to a blog post with earlier comments, including: “Apple is asking that Epic revert Fortnite to exclusively use Apple payments. Their proposal is an invitation for Epic to collude with Apple to maintain their monopoly over in-app payments on iOS, suppressing free market competition and inflating prices. As a matter of principle, we won’t participate in this scheme.”

Epic Games’ titles, including Fortnite, have been a huge success, including through Apple’s App Store.

“We estimate that, since January 2012, Epic Games’ mobile titles have been downloaded more than 159 million times across Apple’s App Store globally, generating approximately $1.2 billion in consumer spending,” Stephanie Chan, mobile insights strategist for Sensor Tower, an app analytics company, told CNBC.

“Thirty percent of this revenue, or approximately $360 million, went to Apple.”

The battle between Apple and Epic Games started after Epic included a new direct purchase option inside Fortnite that circumvented Apple’s 30% revenue cut from in-app purchases. Apple pulled the app from the App Store on the same day and, shortly after, Epic Games filed a lawsuit.

Apple said it provided Epic Games 14 days to update Fortnite to meet its app store guidelines, after which it would suspend Epic Games’ account. Apple said this is standard practice for all developers.

The suspension means Epic Games can no longer submit games or updates to games, like Fortnite, for publication to the iOS and Mac App Stores. While people who already have the game installed can still play it, they just won’t get any updates. Players also can’t buy any in-game content. They also can’t play the new Fortnite season, which recently launched.

Apple said that Fortnite’s users have been directed by Epic Games to contact AppleCare, and that those requests have caused refund quality issues and support problems for Apple users around the world.

MGM Resorts lays off 18,000 workers

MGM Resorts lays off 18,000 workers

MGM Resorts International is laying off 18,000 furloughed workers in the U.S. as a global travel slowdown impedes the casino industry’s recovery from the ongoing pandemic. The job cuts, which start Monday, represent about one-fourth of the company’s pre-pandemic workforce of 68,000 U.S. employees. After casino shutdowns and furloughs in March, the continuing spread of coronavirus in the U.S. has prevented the rebound of many industries, including hospitality, airlines and oil extraction.

Google

Noch ein Jahr im Home-Office

Noch ein Jahr Heimarbeit: Google will für die kommenden zwölf Monate Heimarbeit. Firmenchef Sundar Pichai hat die Entscheidung vergangene Woche nach einer internen Debatte getroffen. Die Google-Mutter Alphabet hatte Ende vergangenen Jahres etwa 119.000 Vollzeit-Mitarbeiter. Der Internet-Konzern legt sich damit als eines der ersten großen Unternehmen auf eine sehr späte Rückkehr in die Büros fest. Zugleich gaben einige Tech-Unternehmen wie etwa Twitter ihren Mitarbeiter bereits die Freiheit, auch nach dem Ende der Corona-Pandemie weiter uneingeschränkt von zuhause arbeiten zu dürfen.

Sport

Formula One

Sebastian Vettel joined Aston Martin

Having announced he will join the Racing Point team in 2021, Sebastian Vettel has revealed he came close to leaving Formula One before closing the new deal. Vettel has driven for Ferrari for the past five years but his contract was not renewed by the Scuderia earlier this year leaving him without a drive.


accidental hit of line judge

Novak Djokovic out of U.S. Open

Novak Djokovic, the No. 1 men’s player and No. 1 seed, was defaulted from the United States Open on Sunday after inadvertently striking a lineswoman with a ball hit in frustration.

Soccer

Lionel Messi confirms he will stay at Barcelona

Lionel Messi is staying at Barcelona. Ten days after he served official notice of his determination to walk out of the Camp Nou, he finally announced that he would not be going after all – not because he had changed his mind, but because he had been left with no choice.


Pelicans' Josh Hart on Donald Trump

'What a dumbass'

New Orleans Pelicans shooting guard Josh Hart on Tuesday mocked President Trump over his claim that protests by NBA players have caused the league's ratings to slump.

Black Live Matter

Athletes have the power to bring change

We are all George Hill – exhausted, dejected and mad as hell, quite frankly. Whether a white ally who has committed to the fight for racial justice or a black American whose very existence, it seems, is an act of unlawful protest in this country or somewhere in between, you could identify with the searing frustration that seeped from the Milwaukee Bucks guard after yet another unarmed black man being gunned down by the boys in blue.

Jared Kushner

NBA players are 'fortunate' to have wealth to take night off

Jared Kushner on Thursday commented on NBA players boycotting playoff games the night before, saying they are “fortunate” to have enough wealth to “take a night off from work” while saying he wants “actual action” in the racial justice movement.

Black Live Matter

Milwaukee Bucks Boycott NBA Playoff Game

The Milwaukee Bucks staged a walkout during Wednesday’s NBA playoff game against the Orlando Magic in response to the recent police shooting of a Black man in Kenosha, Wisconsin, which has resulted in days of unrest.

FC Barcelona

Lionel Messi wants to leave but faces legal battle over clause

Lionel Messi has told Barcelona that he wants to leave the club immediately – and on a free transfer. The Argentinian, who according to RAC1 radio had told new manager Ronald Koeman that he felt “more out than in”, has sent a fax to Barcelona informing them of his desire to go.

Soccer: Brazilian star Ronaldinho

Bizarre six-month stay in Paraguay penal system

After nearly six months entangled in the Paraguayan legal system, Ronaldinho is set to be granted his liberty from house arrest on Monday by judges in Asunción.

PARIS SAINT-GERMAIN-BAYERN MüNCHen 0-1

Stimmen zum Spiel

Immer wenn die Bayern in ihrer Europapokalgeschichte die Partie eindeutig dominiert haben, haben sie das Endspiel verloren, gegen Porto 1987, gegen Aston Villa 1982, gegen United 1999, gegen Chelsea 2012. Wenn es dagegen eine ganz enge Partie war, dann haben die Bayern am Ende den Pokal in den Himmel gestemmt. Das Gesetz besteht weiter. Die Bayern sind die Sieger, und sie sind es, weil sie bei diesem Turnier letztlich das beste Team waren.

Paris Saint-Germain-Bayern Munich 0-1

Bayern Munich win Champions League

When Kingsley Coman stole into space at the far post, he knew that the right ball from Joshua Kimmich could give him the opportunity he had dreamed of. The Champions League final had been tight and tense, with a few chances for either team but, until this point, no clinical edge.

US Open

Serena Williams rejects idea 24th title would be cheapened by thin field

Serena Williams is not concerned that finally breaking through for her record-equaling 24th major singles title at the US Open would be cheapened by the thinned-out field as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

Lyon- Bayern Munich 0-3

Serge Gnabry's double sinks Lyon and fires Bayern into final

The Bayern Munich juggernaut rolls on. Hansi Flick’s team are packed with so many attacking weapons that if some of them do not get you, it feels inevitable that another one will. Here, it was Serge Gnabry who inflicted the fatal cuts on Lyon to set up a mouthwatering final with Paris St-Germain on Sunday.

Shortnews

Black Live Matter

NBA flexes muscle amid partisan attacks

When the Milwaukee Bucks refused to play their playoff game against the Orlando Magic in outrage over the police shooting of Jacob Blake on Wednesday, the NBA — already maligned by some as being too political — took a giant step to the forefront on one of America’s most pressing social issues. Fellow players and athletes from other American sports quickly hailed the historic action, forcing the NBA and other leagues to postpone games over multiple days.

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Black Live Matter

NBA flexes muscle amid partisan attacks

When the Milwaukee Bucks refused to play their playoff game against the Orlando Magic in outrage over the police shooting of Jacob Blake on Wednesday, the NBA — already maligned by some as being too political — took a giant step to the forefront on one of America’s most pressing social issues.

Fellow players and athletes from other American sports quickly hailed the historic action, forcing the NBA and other leagues to postpone games over multiple days.

But the crowd that already had ire for the league, including President Trump and his allies, mocked the NBA players, suggesting that their activism was hollow.

“I think the NBA players are very fortunate that they have the financial position where they're able to take a night off from work without having to have the consequences for themselves financially,” senior White House adviser Jared Kushner said Thursday. “So they have that luxury, which is great.”

While talking to the press later about Hurricane Laura, President Trump called the NBA a “political organization.”

“They’ve become like a political organization, and that’s not a good thing,” Trump said of the NBA, a league where the players are nearly 75 percent Black. “I don’t think that’s a good thing for sports or for the country.”

Fox News host Laura Ingraham, who controversially told NBA front man LeBron James to “shut up and dribble” in 2018, tweeted: “Good. Make it permanent.”

The NBA and its players had already shown strong support for the Black Lives Matter movement since it returned to action from its coronavirus pandemic-induced hiatus at the end of July.

Black Lives Matter is emblazoned on NBA courts in the Orlando “bubble” on the DisneyWorld campus where teams are playing, and players have put messages on their jerseys such as “Say her name,” “Education reform” and “Enough.”

The messages are intended to send a message about racial justice and ensure the names of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Rayshard Brooks and others Black people killed by police are not forgotten.

Floyd was killed by Minneapolis police when a white office knelt on his neck for nearly 9 minutes. Taylor was shot and killed by Louisville police while in her own home in March as officers enforced a controversial “no-knock” warrant. In June, Brooks was shot and killed by a white Atlanta police officer in Wendy’s parking lot.

The boycott Wednesday initially appeared like it might end the NBA season, but the decision to resume play appears to signal the NBA player interest in continuing to use their platform to push for change.

“We had a candid, impassioned and productive conversation yesterday between NBA players, coaches and team governors regarding next steps to further our collective efforts and actions in support of social justice and racial equality,” NBPA Executive Director Michele Roberts and NBA Commissioner Adam Silver said in a joint statement.

The duo stated that teams within the playoff bubble were returning to play “with the understanding that” the league would work with teams to focus on a slate of civil and voting rights programs.

Scott Rochelle, president and CEO of National Basketball Retired Players Association, said that former players were “shocked” by the ability of current players to “effectuate that type of change.”

“Our players have been on the frontline on many social justice issues and they have been vocal their entire lives, but never have they been able to witness this type of immediate impact on the game of basketball.”

Rochelle added: “The player’s passion hasn’t changed, the access to power is what really is at the forefront right now.”

Former NBA player Kenny Smith — who in solidarity with the players walked off the set of TNT’s NBA pregame show which he co-hosts — pushed back against the idea that the players’ actions on Wednesday were political in an interview with CNN’s Wolf Blitzer.

“No. It shows you have power,” Smith told Blitzer, adding that players were citizens with voices. “Sometimes you have to wake people up with a cold glass of water.”

One of the new initiatives being put in place after the boycotts this week will see NBA arenas, currently sitting empty because of the pandemic, become polling sites in November.

Another by-product of talks is the establishment of a “social justice coalition” that will include players, coaches and state governors. The coalition will focus on issues like “increasing access to voting, promoting civic engagement, and advocating for meaningful police and criminal justice reform,” the statement from Silver and Roberts states.

Ronald Koeman

New Barcelona manager

Ronald Koeman is set to be appointed the new Barcelona manager this week to take over from Quique Setién. The former Barcelona player, and assistant manager, will leave his role as Netherlands coach to take over at the Camp Nou in time for the new season. Setién’s days looked numbered even before the humiliating 8-2 defeat against Bayern Munich on Friday and he will leave after seven uncomfortable months. Barcelona finished five points behind Real Madrid in the league and lost to Athletic Bilbao at the quarter-final stage in the Spanish Cup.

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Ronald Koeman

New Barcelona manager

Ronald Koeman is set to be appointed the new Barcelona manager this week to take over from Quique Setién. The former Barcelona player, and assistant manager, will leave his role as Netherlands coach to take over at the Camp Nou in time for the new season.

Setién’s days looked numbered even before the humiliating 8-2 defeat against Bayern Munich on Friday and he will leave after seven uncomfortable months.

Barcelona finished five points behind Real Madrid in the league and lost to Athletic Bilbao at the quarter-final stage in the Spanish Cup. It is the first time in the past 12 years that the club have ended a season trophyless.

Koeman had already turned Barça down, in January, when the club were looking for a replacement for Ernesto Valverde, but this time he could not resist the challenge.

The original preference for the Barça president, Josep Maria Bartomeu, was to hire Mauricio Pochettino but some board members were against that considering the former Espanyol manager once said that he would rather go and work on a farm than manage Barcelona.

NHL Hockey

LA Kings suspend mascot amid sexual harassment allegations

The Los Angeles Kings have suspended the man who portrays the Kings' "Bailey" lion mascot following a sexual harassment lawsuit filed by a former member of the hockey team's ice crew. Tim Smith, the now-suspended mascot, has also served as a senior manager of game presentation and events for the Kings. A woman who was hired onto the team's ice crew in 2018 filed the suit against Smith, the team, and the Kings owner AEG. The lawsuit is seeking over $1 million in damages, the report added. The woman alleges that Smith made lewd jokes and inappropriate sexual comments before firing her when she confronted and condemned his actions.

Borussia Dortmund

Real Madrid youngster Reinier Jesus to joint BVB

Borussia Dortmund are set to sign Real Madrid youngster Reinier Jesus on a one-year loan with an option for another season. The 18-year-old joined Real Madrid in a €30 million transfer from Flamengo in January but has yet to make his senior debut for the La Liga champions. He is now unlikely to make his debut for Los Blancos during the 2021-20 season. Sources confirmed that Dortmund are close to sealing the loan deal for Reinier and he could join his new teammates once they return from their training camp in Switzerland early next week. The agreement will not include a buy option for the Brazil under-23 international.