World

US-Truppenabzug

USA wollen knapp 12.000 Soldaten aus Deutschland abziehen

Die USA haben ihre Pläne für einen Abzug von Truppen aus Deutschland vorgestellt. Aus Bayern und der Eifel sollen Soldaten abreisen – und zwar deutlich mehr als bislang angenommen. Zudem verliert Deutschland eine wichtige Kommandozentrale.

Deutschland

Douglas Macgregor soll US-Botschafter in Berlin werden

Der ehemalige Heeresoffizier soll US-Botschafter in Deutschland werden. Douglas Macgregor arbeitet auch als Experte für Donald Trumps Lieblingssender Fox News.

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Shortnews

CBS News poll

Biden leads Trump Arizona, Minnesota

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden gained a small lead over President Trump in the battleground state of Arizona and holds a larger 9-point lead over the president in Minnesota, according to a new poll. Biden is backed by 47 percent of likely voters in Arizona, compared to Trump’s 44 percent, according to a CBS News poll released Sunday. Biden’s 3-point lead is within the poll’s margin error. Biden has gained on Trump in Arizona since a similar poll conducted in July found the race tied, with 46 percent of likely voters backing both candidates.

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CBS News poll

Biden leads Trump Arizona, Minnesota

Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden gained a small lead over President Trump in the battleground state of Arizona and holds a larger 9-point lead over the president in Minnesota, according to a new poll. Biden is backed by 47 percent of likely voters in Arizona, compared to Trump’s 44 percent, according to a CBS News poll released Sunday. Biden’s 3-point lead is within the poll’s margin error. Biden has gained on Trump in Arizona since a similar poll conducted in July found the race tied, with 46 percent of likely voters backing both candidates.

The survey also found half of Arizona voters said they think Biden would do a better job handling the coronavirus outbreak, with 50 percent saying Biden would handle the outbreak better compared to 37 percent who said the same about Trump.

Biden also leads when asked who would make voters feel more safe, with 46 percent saying Biden and 41 percent saying Trump. The candidates were about even when asked who would do a better job handling the economy, with 45 percent saying Trump and 44 percent saying Biden, based on the poll.

In Minnesota, a state Trump narrowly lost in 2016, Biden is backed by 50 percent of likely voters, based on the poll. The survey found 41 percent of likely voters said they would vote for Trump.

Biden again led Trump when asked about the coronavirus outbreak, with 50 percent saying Biden would do a better job handling the outbreak and 36 percent saying Trump would. Additionally, 47 percent of voters in Minnesota said Biden would make them feel more safe and 42 percent said the same about Trump.

Trump has a lead over Biden when asked about handling the economy. Forty-eight percent of likely voters in Minnesota said Trump would do a better job handling the economy and 44 percent said Biden, based on the poll.

The surveys were conducted on behalf of CBS News by YouGov between Sept. 9 to Sept. 11. The Arizona poll is based on 1,22 registered votes and the margin of error is 3.8 percentage points. The Minnesota poll is based on 1,100 registered voters and has a margin of error of 3.6 percentage points.

Peter Strzok

Donald Trump is compromised by the Russians

Former FBI agent Peter Strzok told NBC’s Chuck Todd Sunday that he still believes President Trump to be “compromised by the Russians...I believed at the time in 2016 and I continue to believe that Donald Trump is compromised by the Russians,” Strzok said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “And when I say that I mean that they hold leverage over him that makes him incapable of placing the national interest, the national security ahead of his own.”

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Peter Strzok

Donald Trump is compromised by the Russians

Former FBI agent Peter Strzok told NBC’s Chuck Todd Sunday that he still believes President Trump to be “compromised by the Russians...I believed at the time in 2016 and I continue to believe that Donald Trump is compromised by the Russians,” Strzok said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.” “And when I say that I mean that they hold leverage over him that makes him incapable of placing the national interest, the national security ahead of his own.”

“One of the largest ways that people in foreign governments gain leverage, certainly in the case of the president, is through financial entanglements,” he added. “And I think when you take a look at the Trump financial enterprise, particularly its relationship with Russian, with Russian monies and potentially those related to organized crime and other elements, that those interactions have placed him in a position where the Russians have leverage over him and are able to influence his actions.”

Todd also questioned Strzok about the text messages between himself and FBI attorney Lisa Page, with whom he had an affair. Todd asked Strzok whether he blamed himself for “putt[ing] [himself] in a compromising position” or whether he believed he was treated unfairly.

“I certainly regret sending the text messages that were absolutely weaponized and used to bludgeon the work of the FBI, the work of the special counsel, I'll always regret that,” Strzok conceded.

However, he claimed that “the way that those were weaponized” was part of an ongoing pattern of the Trump administration purging dissenters.

“Whether it is in the impeachment hearings with regard to Ukraine, the whistleblower, or anybody in any number of federal government agencies - if somebody dares speak the truth about this administration, this administration has shown no boundaries in going after people in ways that frankly is shocking, are shocking and are inappropriate,” he said.

Election 2020

Trump says he'll put personal money into campaign

President Trump said Tuesday that he would spend his own money on his reelection campaign if it were necessary, while downplaying the need for it at this stage. “If I have to, I would, but we’re doing very well,” Trump told reporters at Joint Base Andrews before departing for a two-state trip to Florida and North Carolina. The president claimed that his campaign needed to “spend more money up front” to combat what he described as “disinformation” put forth by Democrats and the press about his administration’s handling of the novel coronavirus.

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Election 2020

Trump says he'll put personal money into campaign

President Trump said Tuesday that he would spend his own money on his reelection campaign if it were necessary, while downplaying the need for it at this stage. “If I have to, I would, but we’re doing very well,” Trump told reporters at Joint Base Andrews before departing to Florida and North Carolina. Trump claimed that his campaign needed to “spend more money up front” to combat what he described as “disinformation” put forth by Democrats and the press about his administration’s handling of the novel coronavirus.

“If we needed any more, I would put it up personally, like I did in the primaries last time,” Trump told reporters, referring to the money he put up for his 2016 campaign. “If I have to, I’ll do it here but we don’t have to because we have double and maybe even triple what we had a number of years ago, four years ago.”

Asked how much of his own money he would consider putting into the campaign, Trump replied: “Whatever it takes, we have to win.”

Trump and Democratic nominee Joe Biden are entering the final two-month stretch of the 2020 presidential election, with national polls showing the former vice president leading the incumbent president by significant margins.

The president’s remarks come amid reports about concerns within his campaign about a potential cash crunch two months from the election. Bloomberg reported earlier Tuesday that Trump had discussed spending up to $100 million of his own money on his 2020 campaign.

The Trump campaign and Republican National Committee built a significant war chest but have spent $800 million on the president’s reelection effort through the month of July.

Meanwhile, the Biden campaign has spent more than $400 million and nearly matched the Trump campaign in cash on hand at the end of July. The campaign and the Democratic National Committee reported last week that they raised a record $365 million in August, the largest-ever one-month fundraising haul.

The New York Times reported Monday that the Trump campaign was grappling with a potential cash crunch as the Nov. 3 election nears. The Trump campaign and RNC have yet to announce their fundraising numbers for last month, though they have disclosed that they raised $76 million during the GOP convention alone, more than the Democrats.

Meanwhile, Trump campaign manager Bill Stepien told reporters that he is “carefully managing the budget” and that the campaign is confident funding will not be an issue down the final stretch.

Earlier Tuesday, Trump defended his campaign spending, tweeting that he needed to spend “a lot of money” in order to “compensate for the false reporting and Fake News concerning our handling of the China Virus,” referring to the coronavirus pandemic.

“Now they see the GREAT job we have done, and we have 3 times more than we had 4 years ago - & are up in polls. Lots of $’s & ENERGY!” Trump tweeted.

COVID-19

Nancy Pelosi not wearing a mask

Nancy Pelosi has been photographed in a San Francisco hair salon without a face covering, breaking the city’s coronavirus prevention rules. Security camera footage, which was obtained by Fox News, shows the Democratic House speaker without a mask on her face as she walked through the salon. Salons in San Francisco have been closed during the coronavirus pandemic, with limited outdoor operations beginning only on Tuesday.

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COVID-19

Nancy Pelosi not wearing a mask

Nancy Pelosi has been photographed in a San Francisco hair salon without a face covering, breaking the city’s coronavirus prevention rules. Security camera footage, which was obtained by Fox News, shows the Democratic House speaker without a mask on her face as she walked through the salon. Salons in San Francisco have been closed during the coronavirus pandemic, with limited outdoor operations beginning only on Tuesday.

The footage, showing Pelosi walking through the eSalon with a face mask around her neck, was filmed during an appointment on Monday.

Pelosi has regularly told US citizens to wear masks and follow the guidelines intended to limit the spread of coronavirus.

The salon’s owner, Erica Kious, said one of her hairstylists who rented a chair at the business had opened it especially for Pelosi’s appointment.

“It was a slap in the face that she went in, you know, that she feels that she can just go and get her stuff done while no one else can go in, and I can’t work,” Kious told Fox News.

“We have been shut down for so long, not just me, but most of the small businesses and I just can’t – it’s a feeling – a feeling of being deflated, helpless and honestly beaten down,” she added.

Kious said that according to her interpretation of the coronavirus safety precautions blow-drying hair was prohibited for salons.

She added: “I have been fighting for six months for a business that took me 12 years to build to reopen,” she said. “I am a single mom, I have two small children, and I have no income.

“We’re supposed to look up to this woman, right? It is just disturbing.”

A spokesman for Pelosi, Drew Hammill, responded that the Californian congresswoman had not realised she was breaking her home city’s virus prevention rules.

“This business offered for the speaker to come in on Monday and told her they were allowed by the city to have one customer at a time in the business,” he said, adding: “The speaker complied with the rules as presented to her by this establishment.”

Nancy Pelosi has claimed to have been “set up”, after she was photographed in a San Francisco hair salon without a face covering, breaking the city’s coronavirus prevention rules.

“I take responsibility for trusting the word of the neighborhood salon that I’ve been to many times,” the House speaker said on Wednesday afternoon, as reported by the San Francisco Chronicle. “It was a setup, and I take responsibility for falling for a setup.”

Wahlkampfspenden

Joe Biden: 300 Millionen Dollar

US-Präsidentschaftskandidat Joe Biden hat einem Medienbericht zufolge allein im August mehr als 300 Millionen Dollar an Wahlkampfspenden erhalten. Die endgültige Summe stehe noch nicht fest, dürfte aber die höchste sein, die jemals ein Präsidentschaftskandidat innerhalb eines Monats verbuchen konnte, zitierte die „New York Times“ am Dienstag zwei mit dem Vorgang vertraute Personen. Im Juli hatte Biden 140 Millionen Dollar eingesammelt. Sein Rivale, Amtsinhaber Donald Trump, kam auf 165 Millionen Dollar.

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Wahlkampfspenden

Joe Biden: 300 Millionen Dollar

US-Präsidentschaftskandidat Joe Biden hat einem Medienbericht zufolge allein im August mehr als 300 Millionen Dollar an Wahlkampfspenden erhalten. Die endgültige Summe stehe noch nicht fest, dürfte aber die höchste sein, die jemals ein Präsidentschaftskandidat innerhalb eines Monats verbuchen konnte, zitierte die „New York Times“ am Dienstag zwei mit dem Vorgang vertraute Personen.

Im Juli hatte Biden 140 Millionen Dollar eingesammelt. Sein Rivale, Amtsinhaber Donald Trump, kam auf 165 Millionen Dollar.

Für August hat der Wahlkampfstab des Präsidenten noch keine Zahlen genannt. Ein Sprecher von Bidens Kampagne wollte vorerst keine Summe preisgeben, da sie noch nicht endgültig feststehe.

Die Wahl ist am 3. November angesetzt. Der Demokrat Biden liegt in den meisten landesweiten Umfragen vor dem Republikaner Trump.