Special

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler: 'leave altogether'

Trump sent secret cops and they're ‘kidnapping people off the streets’

Federal law enforcement officials deployed by President Donald Trump to Portland, Oregon are, by all accounts, operating as if the city is a police state, according to multiple reports and videos.

Katholische Kirche

Carolin Kebekus: "Ihr habt uns zu Nutten gemacht"

Carolin Kebekus (40) geht erneut hart mit der katholischen Kirche ins Gericht. Ein Video der Komikerin, das am Donnerstag veröffentlicht wurde, befasst sich mit der Rolle der Frauen in kirchlichen Institutionen - und lässt daran kein gutes Haar.

USA

20m Americans could have contracted Covid-19

US government experts believe more than 20 million Americans could have contracted coronavirus – 10 times more than official counts, as cases are now rising in more than half of states and a new warning came of the risk of “apocalyptic” infection in major cities.

DONALD TRUMP

Neue Kritik an Deutschland: "Billion"-Schulden

Der Neustart seines Wahlkampfs ist für US-Präsident Donald Trump bei der ersten Massenkundgebung seit Beginn der Corona-Krise enttäuschend verlaufen. Bei der Veranstaltung in einer Arena in Tulsa (Oklahoma) blieben am Samstagabend zahlreiche der gut rund 19.200 Plätze leer.

Bill BARR

Trump on firing of Geoffrey Berman: 'I'm not involved'

Geoffrey Berman, the US attorney for the Southern District of New York, said in a statement Saturday that he would leave his post after Attorney General William Barr sent him a letter saying that President Donald Trump had removed him.

Stampede Trail Alaska

Alaska's 'Into the Wild' bus has been removed by air

The abandoned bus on the Stampede Trail in Alaska - made famous by the book and film "Into the Wild" - has made its first journey in decades. This time by air.

Deutschland

Donald Trump will 10.000 Soldaten abziehen

US-Präsident Donald Trump will Deutschland mit dem Abzug von fast 10.000 Soldaten für aus seiner Sicht zu geringe Militärausgaben bestrafen. Er kündigte an, den nach Japan größten US-Truppenstandort weltweit drastisch zu verkleinern: Von derzeit 34.500 Soldaten sollen nur 25.000 übrig bleiben.

Shortnews

New York City

Spike in coronavirus infection rate

New York City is seeing a “very worrisome” sustained increase in Covid-19 infections across the five boroughs, Mayor Bill de Blasio and public health officials said Thursday. The city’s positive test rate hit 1.92 percent based on a seven-day average, the highest number in weeks and the first time the metric has seen a "meaningful jump" since the city began tracking it in September, de Blasio said. The one-day rate was even higher, at 2.7 percent.

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New York City

Spike in coronavirus infection rate

New York City is seeing a “very worrisome” sustained increase in Covid-19 infections across the five boroughs, Mayor Bill de Blasio and public health officials said Thursday. The city’s positive test rate hit 1.92 percent based on a seven-day average, the highest number in weeks and the first time the metric has seen a "meaningful jump" since the city began tracking it in September, de Blasio said. The one-day rate was even higher, at 2.7 percent.

The city reported 532 new coronavirus cases — a number that has been hovering around the city’s 550 threshold for keeping the pandemic under control, which it breached earlier this week. While previous spikes were driven by outbreaks confined to certain neighborhoods in Brooklyn and Queens, officials now say new cases are increasing across the city.

“We do see a slow and steady rise throughout many, many parts of the city,” said public health adviser Jay Varma.

The city plans to shut down its school system, which has reopened in fits and starts, if the positive test rate on a seven day average hits 3 percent. The mayor has called for shutting down indoor dining if it hits 2 percent, though the final decision would rest with Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

No Russian citizenship

Snowden given permanent residency in Russia

Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor charged with espionage in 2013, was granted permanent residency in Russia, according to multiple reports. Snowden has lived in Russia since 2013 to avoid prosecution in the United States. He was charged after releasing classified documents on American surveillance programs.

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No Russian citizenship

Snowden given permanent residency in Russia

Edward Snowden, the former National Security Agency (NSA) contractor charged with espionage in 2013, was granted permanent residency in Russia, according to multiple reports. Snowden has lived in Russia since 2013 to avoid prosecution in the United States. He was charged after releasing classified documents on American surveillance programs.

“Today, Snowden was handed a residency permit for an unlimited period of time,” Snowden’s attorney Anatoly Kucherena told Russia’s state Tass news agency, The Associated Press reported.

Kucherena also told the Interfax news agency that his application was submitted in April, but approval was delayed due to the lockdowns amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, according to the AP.

The attorney also said Snowden is not currently applying for Russian citizenship.

The whistleblower has previously said he is willing to return to the U.S. if he is guaranteed a fair trial.

Snowden last month agreed to pay over $5 million in profits from his book and speaking fees to the U.S. government. A federal judge ruled in favor of the Justice Department in a lawsuit filed against Snowden arguing that his autobiography violated a nondisclosure agreement.

As of last month, Snowden had earned over $4.2 million from the book sales.

President Trump earlier this year said he was considering a pardon for Snowden, telling reporters at a news conference that “There are many, many people — it seems to be a split decision that many people think that he should be somehow treated differently, and other people think he did very bad things.”

COVID 19: Idaho

School teachers go on strike

Hundreds of school teachers in an Idaho district have gone on strike over an uptick in local COVID-19 outbreaks. Over 700 educators in the West Ada School District called out sick Monday, leading to more than 400 teachers calling out sick on Tuesday after the district said it would proceed with some in-person and virtual learning, a local ABC affiliate KSAW-LD reported.

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COVID 19: Idaho

School teachers go on strike

Hundreds of school teachers in an Idaho district have gone on strike over an uptick in local COVID-19 outbreaks. Over 700 educators in the West Ada School District called out sick Monday, leading to more than 400 teachers calling out sick on Tuesday after the district said it would proceed with some in-person and virtual learning, a local ABC affiliate KSAW-LD reported.

Teachers joined the strike after the district moved to proceed with learning sessions despite warnings by Central District Health (CDH) that Ada County was considered a coronavirus "red" zone, indicating a significant threat of possible virus transmissions.

"When is enough, enough? If red is not the line, where is the line?" said West Ada teacher Zach Borman.

Borman represents one of the roughly 700 teachers who called out sick on Monday.

"I would basically argue I am sick; this has been the most stressful and terrifying thing of my life," said Borman, adding that he is grading papers while voicing caution about the current COVID-19 threat in the school district.

The West Ada teachers union said it disagreed with the school board's plan to continue some in-person classes amid the district's rising safety risks, Idaho Press reported.

The decision to strike was met with backlash by users on social media, voicing dissatisfaction and critiquing the teachers who called out sick Monday.

"The lack of empathy, you can see it too just scrolling out on Facebook, to see some of those comments directed at them is heartbreaking," said Chelsey McGee, a a parent in the school district.

Borman has voiced his concerns during board meetings and via rounds of email, saying the hybrid learning the school has performed this semester is too risky given the current health guidance.

Some critics questioned the impact it would have on the students attempting to learn while navigating the pandemic's complex logistics.

"I don't think there's a single teacher in this district that's still in this district that doesn't care greatly about the education of their students," said Borman, adding, "I'm insulted by anyone that is assuming I'm doing this because I don't care about kids' education."

CDH reported a trend of rising infections throughout Ada County in early September.

On Oct. 11, the county recorded 548 cases and 23 new cases on Oct. 18, though some data could still be missing from more recent updates.

Since the outset of the pandemic, 157 fatalities due to COVID-19 have been recorded in the county.

COVID-19

Trump calls 200,000 deaths in U.S. ‘a shame’

The coronavirus death toll in the United States surpassed 200,000 on Tuesday, marking another milestone of loss at a time when many have become numb to the rising fatality count. The tally represents the upper boundary of a fatality range that President Trump in March said would signal that his administration had “done a very good job” of protecting Americans from the coronavirus. As he left the White House for Pennsylvania on Tuesday evening, Trump responded to a reporter’s question about the 200,000 deaths, saying, “It’s a shame.”

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COVID-19

Trump calls 200,000 deaths in U.S. ‘a shame’

Florida Voting

Bloomberg pays fines for 32,000 felons

Billionaire Michael Bloomberg has reportedly raised more than $16 million in an effort to help convicted felons in Florida register to vote. The Florida Rights Restoration Coalition estimated Bloomberg's fundraising push has already paid off monetary obligations for 32,000 felons, Axios reported. "The right to vote is fundamental to our democracy and no American should be denied that right," a Bloomberg spokesperson told the news outlet.

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Florida Voting

Bloomberg pays fines for 32,000 felons

Billionaire Michael Bloomberg has reportedly raised more than $16 million in an effort to help convicted felons in Florida register to vote. The Florida Rights Restoration Coalition estimated Bloomberg's fundraising push has already paid off monetary obligations for 32,000 felons, Axios reported. "The right to vote is fundamental to our democracy and no American should be denied that right," a Bloomberg spokesperson told the news outlet.

"Working together with the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition, we are determined to end disenfranchisement and the discrimination that has always driven it."

Florida passed a law in 2018 reinstating voting rights for felons that dictated they could register only if they pay all fines, fees and restitution — sometimes totaling more than $1,000 — owed to the government.

The 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which covers Florida, last week ruled to uphold the law.

Last week, several television networks also pledged to donate money to the cause.

Bloomberg, who ran in the Democratic primary for president, has endorsed the party's nominee, Joe Biden, and has donated at least $100 million to the former vice president's campaign to defeat President Trump.